Copy

Newsletter / Bulletin

April / Avril 2021
Le français suit...

Table of Contents

Announcements

  1. Spring has sprung - our 2021 general issue (37.1) is out now
  2. Our next (fall) issue (37.2): A sneak peak
  3. For Refuge authors: link your Refuge article to your Orcid ID!
  4. Making Refuge more accessibility in 2021 - a first update
  5. Refuge and RSQ editors participated in LERRN webinar on Knowledge, Access and Representation, Feb 26, 2021
  6. Most viewed Refuge articles - last 30 days
  7. Ongoing - Call for COVID papers and documentary film reviews
  8. It’s a celebration: Refuge turning 40 in 2021!

Spring has sprung - our 2021 general issue is out now! Here is the 37.1 line up:

Schmitt, C. (2021). ‘I want to give something back’: Social Support and Reciprocity in the Lives of Young Refugees. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40690

Abstract
This article analyzes the support relationships of ten asylum-seeking young people who fled to Germany between 2010 and 2015. It highlights their wish for reciprocity as a need in their country of destination and expands upon Sahlin’s typology of reciprocal relationships (generalised, balanced and negative reciprocity) by the type of “refused reciprocity“. “Refused reciprocity“occurs when people are keen to reciprocate for support they have received, but they live in environments that restrict their agency. The article argues that participation means not only the provision of support, but the creation of opportunities for people to experience themselves as self-effective actors. They become self-effective when they can cope successfully with new and difficult situations on their own.

van Kooy, J., Magee, L. & Robertson, S. (2021). ‘Boat people’ and Discursive Bordering: Australian Parliamentary Discourses on Asylum Seekers, 1977-2013. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40661

Abstract
This paper draws upon content analysis of Australian parliamentary transcripts to examine debates about asylum seekers who arrived by boat in three historical periods: 1977-79, 1999-2001, and 2011-13. We analyse term frequency and co-occurrence to identify patterns in specific usage of the phrase ‘boat people.’ We then identify how the term is variously deployed in parliament over time and discuss the relationship between these uses and government policy and practice. We conclude that forms of ‘discursive bordering’ have amplified representations of asylum seekers as security threats to be controlled within and outside Australia’s sovereign territory. The scope of policy or legislative responses to boat arrivals is limited by a poverty of political language, thus corroborating recent conceptual arguments around the securitization and extra-territorialization of the contemporary border.

Shuyab, M. & Ahmad, N. (2021). The Psychosocial Condition of Syrian Children Amid a Precarious Future. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(1). https://doi.org/ 10.25071/1920-7336.40654
 
Abstract
This study investigates the psychosocial conditions of Syrian refugees and vulnerable Lebanese children in Lebanese public schools. A survey was conducted with Syrian and Lebanese children and their parents. Interviews with public school staff were also carried out. The study found that both poverty and war play equal roles in affecting children’s emotional wellbeing as Syrian and Lebanese children manifest similar levels of anxiety and hyperactivity. While the past presents significant stressors, present and future stressors were also identified amongst refugees. This paper critiques the prime emphasis of psychosocial intervention paradigms on past trauma, which risks overlooking present and future stressors. It argues that the psychosocial conditions of refugees are interpreted in isolation from refugees’ poverty, subordinated social status, and the local injustices to which they are subject.

Tynewydd, I., Semlyen, J., North, S. & Rushworth, I. “Volunteer Mentor Experiences of Mentoring Forced Migrants in the UK,” Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(1). 
https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40708

Abstract
Research demonstrates the complex nature of supporting forced migrant populations, however, there exists almost no research regarding volunteer experience of supporting forced migrants. This study explored the experiences of volunteer mentors in the United Kingdom. Eight participants were recruited from a single charitable organisation. Data were collected using in-depth, semi-structured interviews and verbatim transcripts were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Four superordinate themes emerged: Paralyzed by Responsibility and Powerlessness, Weighty Emotional Fallout, Navigating Murky Boundaries and Enriched with Hope, Joy and Inspiration. Participants experienced a range of emotions as a result of their mentoring: from distress to inspiration. Findings suggest focusing on achievable changes helps mentors. The mentoring relationship is hugely important to mentors but also requires careful navigation. The findings suggest that, whilst it is a fulfilling experience, support is required for volunteers mentoring forced migrants. The relative strengths and limitations of the study are considered. Theoretical implications and suggestions for organizations, clinical applications and future research are provided.

Raska, J. (2021). “Small Gold Mine of Talent”: Integrating Prague Spring Refugee Professionals in Canada, 1968-1969. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40660

Abstract
Following the August 1968 Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia, 11,200 Prague Spring refugees were resettled in Canada. This movement included many experienced professionals and skilled tradespeople. As part of its efforts to help the refugees with their economic and social integration, Canadian officials provided  assisted passage, initial accommodations, help with securing Canadian employment, and English- or French-language training. Prague Spring refugees navigated professional obstacles including securing accreditation of their foreign credentials and underemployment in their respective fields. Their successful resettlement and integration depended on intergovernmental cooperation between Canada and its provinces, and the assistance provided by local Czech and Slovak communities across the country.

Liew, J., Zambelli, P., Thériault, P-A. & Silcoff, M. (2021). Not Just the Luck of the Draw? Exploring Competency of Counsel and other Qualitative Factors in Federal Court Refugee Leave Determinations (2005-2010). Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(1).
https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40655

Abstract
Refugee claimants who have received a negative decision from the Immigration and Refugee Board sometimes judicially review the decisions at the Federal Court in Canada. Previous statistical studies, in particular Sean Rehaag’s (2012) study, “The Luck of the Draw”,  have reported that rejected refugee claimants seeking judicial review face low and inconsistent leave grant rates, with chances of success largely dependent on judge assignment. The present research looks beyond these quantitative findings to identify additional factors that may explain the troubling statistics. To this end, four researchers manually reviewed 50 leave applications submitted between 2005 and 2010 and included in Rehaag’s (2012) data set.  The results of this qualitative analysis were disturbing; a significant number of rejected leave applications had been poorly prepared, and a number of facially strong cases were denied leave.  These results suggest that leave grant rates could rise if the quality of legal representation were enhanced. They also indicate that rejected refugee claimants would benefit from clear and uniformly applied criteria for granting leave.

Book reviews


Review of Refugee Law’s Fact-Finding Crisis: Truth, Risk, and the Wrong Mistake by Hilary Evans Cameron, Cambridge University Press, 2018, by Melissa M. Anderson  https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40868

Review of Lights in the Distance: Exile and Refuge at the Borders of Europe, by Daniel Trilling, Picador, 2018, by Hélène Syed Zwick, https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40869

Review of International Migration Law by Vincent Chetail, Oxford University Press, 2019, by Olga R. Gulina https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40870

Review of The Palestinian Authority in the West Bank, by Michelle Pace and Somdeep Sen, Routledge, 2019,  by Delaney Campbell https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40871
 
 

Film Review

Review of Sky and Ground (directed by Tayla Tibbon & Joshua Bennett), Humanity on the Move film series, 2018 (86 min), by Neda Moayeerian and Max Stephenson Jr. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40872

 



Our next (fall) issue (37.2): sneak peak

Our next (fall) issue (37.2) coming in the fall of 2021, will contain a special focus section on ‘Humanizing Studies of Refuge and Displacement.’ Guest editors: Yolanda Weima (York University, Canada) and Hanno Brankamp (University of Oxford).
 


For Refuge authors: link your Refuge article to your ORCID iD!

Hey, Refuge authors - if you have always been meaning to link your past Refuge publication to your ORCID iD, you now can! There are a few different ways to do this, for instance, just add the DOI for your article to your ORCID profile et voilà! To learn more about the use of ORCID by Refuge, please visit the “what is ORCID? page on the Refuge site.
 
 

Making Refuge more accessible in 2021 - a first update

As we mentioned in our winter 2020 newsletter, in 2021 Refuge’s “look” will be evolving to make it more accessible. We are actively working toward compliance with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) and the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0).
 
First results: Refuge now runs on OJS 3.3, the latest version of our journal’s publication platform, which PKP redesigned following an external accessibility audit in 2019. Second, all Refuge articles in 37.1 now contain tags, making them easier to navigate for our readers using assistive technologies, such as screen readers. We are also working with our authors to make all charts, graphs and images accessible. As part of this transformation, our submission guidelines will be revised. Third, all articles will also be published as an accessible Word file, making them friendlier to readers using mobile devices or text-to-speech. Fourth, all article-specific references will now be added to its metadata, which will make the article even easier to find and index. The fall issue will feature additional changes, including keywords, well as a layout refresh in line with accessibility guidelines.
 
 

Refuge and RSQ editors participated in LERRN webinar on Knowledge, Access and Representation, Feb 26, 2021


On Feb 26, the editors-in-chief of Refuge (Dagmar Soennecken) and Refugee Survey Quarterly (David Cantor), together with Maha Shuayab, Director of the Centre for Lebanese Studies (CLS), Lebanese American University (and guest co-editor of our recent special issue, 36.2 on refugee children), participated in a webinar to reflect on a recent analysis of the two journals by members of The Local Engagement Refugee Research Network (LERRN). It examined author affiliations and geographic representation in both journals and asked the journal editors to engage with broader questions about the politics of knowledge production in leading forced migration journals. Results of an earlier study (of the Journal of Refugee Studies) on the same topic were previously published in the LERRN newsletter in May 2020.
 
Refuge and the RSQ represent two very different publication models - Refuge is fully open access (#OA) and non-profit, with generally no fees charged to both readers and authors, while the RSQ is a commercial journal backed by a large, academic publisher (Oxford) with fees charged to both readers and authors (for journal subscription and for making articles open access). Nevertheless, the data gathered by LERRN was remarkably similar. Although scholars who published in Refuge compared to those in the RSQ and are from many parts of the world, those from the Global North still predominate. The majority of articles published continue to be about refugees in the region where the journals are based (Canada, the UK, Europe).
 
Clearly, even for “diamond” #OA journals like Refuge, this means that we still have a lot of work to do when it comes to equalizing knowledge production. As participants in the webinar discussed, initiatives, such as sharing access to research grant funding, diversifying editorial boards and creating collaborations with under-represented scholars with the goal of increasing representation in journal publications, are only a few, small steps that academics and academic journals can take to decolonize academia. Watch for Refuge-specific initiatives in this regard in subsequent editions of the Refuge newsletter or contact us if you have any ideas or would like to become involved.
 


Most viewed Refuge articles - last 30 days

Pittaway, E. & Bartolomei, L. (2001) Refugees, Race, and Gender: The Multiple Discrimination against Refugee Women, Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 19(6), 21-32. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21236
 
Gutiérrez Rodríguez, E. (2018). The Coloniality of Migration and the “Refugee Crisis”: On the Asylum-Migration Nexus, the Transatlantic White European Settler Colonialism-Migration and Racial Capitalism. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 34(1), 16–28. https://doi.org/10.7202/1050851ar
 
Loescher, G. (2017). UNHCR’s Origins and Early History: Agency, Influence, and Power in Global Refugee Policy. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 33(1), 77–86. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40450
 

 

It’s a celebration: Refuge turning 40 in 2021!

Some of you may know that Refuge was founded at York University in 1981. This means, we are turning 40 in 2021!!! The current and past editors-in-chief of Refuge have already begun to virtually stick their (our) heads together and are planning “something,” so stay tuned for what they (we) have up their sleeve in that regard! Ideas also welcome.

Table des matières

Annonces
  1. Le printemps est arrivé! Notre numéro général de 2021 (37.1) est maintenant disponible!
  2. Un aperçu de notre prochain numéro d’automne (37.2)
  3. Pour les auteur.es: connectez votre article dans Refuge à votre identifiant ORCID!
  4. Rendre la revue Refuge plus accessible en 2021: une première mise à jour
  5. Participation des rédacteurs de Refuge et de RSQ à un webinaire LERRN sur le savoir, l’accès et la représentation le 26 février 2021
  6. Articles les plus consultés - 30 derniers jours
  7. Refuge célèbre son 40e anniversaire en 2021!
 

Le printemps est arrivé! Notre numéro général de 2021 (37.1) est maintenant disponible!

Schmitt, C. “I want to give something back“: Social Support and Reciprocity in the Lives of Young Refugees. Refuge : Revue Canadienne Sur Les réfugiés, 37(1), 3–12.
https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40690
 
Résumé
Cet article analyse les relations de soutien de dix jeunes demandeurs d’asile ayant fui en Allemagne entre 2010 et 2015. Il souligne leur besoin de réciprocité dans leur pays de destination et élargit la typologie des relations de réciprocité de Sahlin (réciprocité généralisée, équilibrée et négative) avec le type « réciprocité refusée ». La « réciprocité refusée» survient dans les cas où les gens désirent rendre la pareille pour le soutien reçu, mais vivent dans des environnements qui posent des limites à leur agentivité. L’article soutient que la participation ne se limite pas à la prestation de soutien, mais comprend la création d’opportunités permettant aux gens de se reconnaître eux-mêmes comme des acteurs auto-efficaces. L’efficacité personnelle apparaît lorsque les personnes réalisent et sentent qu’elles peuvent faire face des situations nouvelles et difficiles avec succès grâce à leurs propres capacités.

van Kooy, J., Magee, L., & Robertson, S. ’Boat people’ and Discursive Bordering: Australian Parliamentary Discourses on Asylum Seekers, 1977-2013. Refuge : Revue Canadienne Sur Les réfugiés, 37(1), 13–26. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40661
 
Résumé
Cet article s’appuie sur une analyse de contenu de transcriptions de débats parlementaires australiens sur les demandeurs d’asile arrivés par bateau lors de trois périodes historiques: 1977–1979, 1999–2001 et 2011–2013. Nous analysons la fréquence et cooccurrence des termes afin d’identifier des tendances dans l’utilisation spécifique de l’expression « boat people ». Nous identifions ensuite comment le terme est déployé dans les débats parlementaires à travers le temps et discutons du rapport entre ces utilisations et les politiques publiques et pratiques gouvernementales. Nous en arrivons à la conclusion que des formes de traçage discursif de frontières ont amplifié les représentations des demandeurs d’asile comme une menace sécuritaire devant être contrôlée à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur du territoire souverain de l’Australie. L’étendue des réponses politiques ou législatives à l’arrivée des bateaux est limitée par la pauvreté du langage politique, corroborant ainsi les arguments conceptuels récents autour de la sécurisation et de l’extraterritorialisation de la frontière contemporaine.

Shuayb, M., & Ahmad, N. The Psychosocial Condition of Syrian Children Facing a Precarious Future. Refuge : Revue Canadienne Sur Les réfugiés, 37(1), 27–37. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40654
 
Résumé
Cette étude examine les conditions psychosociales des enfants réfugiés syriens et des enfants libanais vulnérables dans les écoles publiques libanaises. Un sondage a été réalisé auprès d’enfants syriens et libanais et de leurs parents. Des entrevues avec le personnel scolaire ont aussi été effectuées. Cette étude démontre que la pauvreté et la guerre affectent de manière égale le bien-être émotionnel des enfants, les enfants syriens et libanais manifestant des niveaux similaires d’anxiété et d’hyperactivité. Alors que le passé comporte des facteurs de stress significatifs, des facteurs de stress présents et futurs ont aussi été identifiés chez les réfugiés. Cet article critique les paradigmes d’intervention psychosociale qui mettent l’accent sur les traumatismes passés, au risque de négliger les facteurs de stress présents et futurs. L’article soutient que les conditions psychosociales des réfugiés sont interprétées indépendamment de leur pauvreté, de leur statut social subordonné et des injustices locales dont ils font l’objet.

Tynewydd, I., Semlyen, J., North, S., & Rushworth, I. (2021) Volunteer Mentor Experiences of Mentoring Forced Migrants in the United Kingdom. Refuge: Revue Canadienne Sur Les réfugiés, 37(1), 38–49. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40708
 
Résumé
Les recherches démontrent la complexité de soutenir des populations en situation de migration forcée. Cependant, peu d’études portent sur l’expérience des bénévoles soutenant les migrants forcés. Cette étude explore les expériences de mentors bénévoles au Royaume-Uni. Huit participants ont été recrutés dans un organisme de bienfaisance particulier. Les données ont été recueillies à l’aide d’entrevues semi-structurées approfondies. Les transcriptions textuelles ont fait l’objet d’une analyse interprétative phénoménologique. Quatre thèmes principaux ont émergé : «Paralysé par la responsabilité et l’impuissance», «Lourdes répercussions émotionnelles», «Naviguer des frontières troubles» et «Enrichi d’espoir, de joie et d’inspiration». Les participants ont vécu une gamme d’émotions suite à leur mentorat, allant de la détresse à l’inspiration. Les résultats indiquent que le fait de se concentrer sur des changements réalisables aide les mentors. La relation de mentorat a une énorme importance pour les mentors mais demande aussi une navigation prudente. Les résultats indiquent que bien qu’il s’agisse d’une expérience enrichissante, un soutien pour les bénévoles qui agissent comme mentors auprès des migrants forcés est requis. Les forces et limites relatives à l'étude sont prises en compte. Nous abordons les implications théoriques de nos résultats et offrons des suggestions pour les organisations, le milieu clinique et la recherche future.

Raska, J. (2021) ’Small Gold Mine of Talent’: Integrating Prague Spring Refugee Professionals and Students in Canada, 1968-1969. Refuge : Revue Canadienne Sur Les réfugiés, 37(1), 50–60.
https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40660


Résumé

Suite à l’invasion menée par l’Union soviétique en Tchécoslovaquie en août 1968, 11 200 réfugiés du Printemps de Prague ont été relocalisés au Canada. Ce mouvement comprenait plusieurs professionnels expérimentés et ouvriers qualifiés. Cet article examine comment ces réfugiés ont composé avec la formation linguistique et les obstacles à l’emploi, y compris l’accréditation professionnelle, et examine comment cette expérience a façonné la vision bureaucratique et publique de l'intégration des réfugiés. Cet article se concentre principalement sur les efforts de réinstallation et d'intégration en Ontario, étant donné qu'environ la moitié des réfugiés du Printemps de Prague ont été réinstallés de façon permanente dans la province. Cet article décrit comment, dans le cadre de leurs efforts pour favoriser l’intégration économique et sociale des réfugiés, les autorités canadiennes leur ont fourni une aide au transport, un hébergement initial, de l’aide pour obtenir un emploi au Canada et une formation linguistique en anglais ou en français. Les réfugiés du Printemps de Prague ont été confrontés à des obstacles professionnels, notamment en ce qui concerne l’accréditation de leurs diplômes étrangers et le sous-emploi dans leurs domaines respectifs. Le succès de leur relocalisation et de leur intégration reposait sur la coopération intergouvernementale entre le Canada et ses provinces et sur le soutien apporté par les communautés tchèques et slovaques locales à travers le pays.


 
Liew, J. C. Y., Zambelli, P., Theriault, P.-A., & Silcoff, M. (2021) Not Just the Luck of the Draw? Exploring Competency of Counsel and Other Qualitative Factors in Federal Court Refugee Leave Determinations (2005-2010). Refuge : Revue Canadienne Sur Les réfugiés, 37(1), 61–72. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40655


Résumé

Les demandeurs d’asile ayant reçu une décision négative de la Commission de l’immigration et du statut de réfugié font parfois une demande en révision judiciaire à la Cour fédérale du Canada. Des études statistiques antérieures, et particulièrement l’étude de Sean Rehaag (2012) «The Luck of the Draw», ont signalé que les demandeurs du d’asile déboutés demandant une révision judiciaire font face à des taux d’acceptation des demandes d’autorisation bas et inconstants, les chances de succès dépendant largement du juge désigné. La présente recherche cherche à aller au-delà de ces résultats quantitatifs afin d’identifier des facteurs additionnels pouvant expliquer ces statistiques troublantes. À cette fin, quatre chercheurs ont révisé manuellement 50 demandes d’autorisation soumises entre 2005 et 2010, incluant l’ensemble de données de Rehaag (2012). Les résultats de cette analyse qualitative sont inquiétants. Un nombre significatif de demandes d’autorisation rejetées ont été mal préparées et un nombre de cas de prime abord solides se sont vus refuser l’autorisation. Ces résultats suggèrent que les taux d’autorisations accordées pourraient augmenter si la qualité de la représentation légale était améliorée. Ils indiquent également que les demandeurs d’asile déboutés bénéficieraient de la mise en place de critères clairs et uniformément appliqués en ce qui concerne l’acceptation des demandes d’autorisation.  


 

Recensions d’ouvrages 

Recension de Refugee Law’s Fact-Finding Crisis: Truth, Risk, and the Wrong Mistake de Hilary Evans Cameron, Cambridge University Press, 2018, par Melissa M. Anderson  https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40868 

Recension de Lights in the Distance: Exile and Refuge at the Borders of Europe, de Daniel Trilling, Picador, 2018, par Hélène Syed Zwick, https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40869

Recension de International Migration Law de Vincent Chetail, Oxford University Press, 2019, par Olga R. Gulina https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.4

Recension de The Palestinian Authority in the West Bank, de Michelle Pace et Somdeep Sen, Routledge, 2019,  par Delaney Campbell https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40871


Comptes-rendus de films

Compte-rendu de Sky and Ground (sous la direction de Tayla Tibbon et Joshua Bennett), Humanity on the Move film series, 2018 (86 min), par Neda Moayeerian et Max Stephenson Jr. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40872
 


 

Un aperçu de notre prochain numéro d’automne (37.2) 2021  

Notre prochain numéro (37.2) à paraître à l’automne 2021 contiendra une section spéciale intitulée « Humanizing Studies of Refuge and Displacement». Rédacteurs invités: Yolanda Weima (York University, Canada) et Hanno Brankamp (University of Oxford).
 
 

Pour les auteur.es : connectez votre article dans Refuge à votre identifiant ORCID!

Auteur.es de Refuge - si vous souhaitez connecter vos publications passées à votre identifiant ORCID, c’est maintenant possible! Il y a plusieurs façons de procéder. Vous pouvez par exemple ajouter le DOI de votre article à votre profil ORCID et le tour est joué! Pour en savoir plus sur l’utilisation de ORCID par Refuge, veuillez consulter la page «Qu’est-ce que ORCID?» sur le site web de Refuge.
 
 

Rendre la revue Refuge plus accessible en 2021: une première mise à jour  

Tel que mentionné dans l’infolettre de l’hiver 2020, le «look» de Refuge va changer en 2021 et gagnera en accessibilité. Nous travaillons activement en vue de nous conformer à la Loi sur l’accessibilité pour les personnes handicapées de l’Ontario et aux Règles pour l'accessibilité des contenus Web (WCAG 2.0).

Premièrement, Refuge fonctionne maintenant sur OJS 3.3, la version la plus récente de notre plateforme de publication, qui a été reconçue par PKP suite à un audit externe sur l’accessibilité en 2019. Deuxièmement, tous les articles du numéro 37.1 contiennent maintenant des étiquettes, ce qui rend la navigation plus facile pour les lecteurs utilisant des technologies d’assistance comme les lecteurs d’écran. Nous travaillons également avec les auteur.es afin de rendre tous les tableaux, graphiques et images accessibles. Dans le cadre de cette transformation, nos directives de soumission seront révisées. Troisièmement, tous les articles  publiés en tant que fichiers Word accessibles, ce qui est plus convivial pour les lecteurs utilisant un appareil mobile ou un synthétiseur texte-parole. Quatrièmement, toutes les références spécifiques à un article seront maintenant ajoutées à ses métadonnées, ce qui rendra l’article encore plus facile à trouver et à répertorier. Le numéro d’automne comprendra des changements additionnels, notamment quant aux mots-clés, ainsi qu’une configuration renouvelée conformément aux directives sur l’accessibilité.
 

Participation des rédacteurs de Refuge et de RSQ à un webinaire LERRN sur le savoir, l’accès et la représentation le 26 février 2021

Le 26 février, la rédactrice en chef de Refuge (Dagmar Soennecken) and le rédacteur en chef de Refugee Survey Quarterly (David Cantor), ainsi que Maha Shuayb, directrice du Centre for Lebanese Studies à la Lebanese American University (et co-rédactrice invitée de notre numéro spécial le plus récent, 36.2, sur les enfants réfugiés), ont participé à un webinaire afin de réfléchir à une analyse récente des deux revues effectuée par des membres du Local Engagement Refugee Research Network (LERRN). Cette analyse examinait les affiliations et la représentation géographique des auteur.es dans les deux revues et appelait les rédacteurs.trices à discuter de questions plus larges entourant les politiques de production du savoir dans les revues de premier plan sur la migration forcée. Les résultats d’une étude antérieure (sur le Journal of Refugee Studies) sur le même sujet ont été publiés dans l’infolettre du LERRN en mai 2020.

Refuge et RSQ représentent deux modèles de publication très différents. Refuge est une revue en accès libre et à but non-lucratif, généralement sans frais pour les lecteurs et les auteurs, tandis que RSQ est une revue commerciale soutenue par un grand éditeur universitaire (Oxford) et faisant payer des frais aux lecteurs et aux auteurs (pour les abonnements à la revue et pour rendre les articles libres d’accès). Néanmoins, les données recueillies par le LERRN étaient remarquablement similaires. Malgré le fait que les chercheurs publiant dans Refuge, comparativement à ceux publiant dans RSQ, viennent de différentes parties du monde, les auteur.es du Nord global prédominent et la majorité des articles publiés continuent de porter sur les réfugiés dans les régions où ces revues sont basées (Canada, Royaume-Uni, Europe).

Ces données signifient que même des revues "diamond” #OA comme Refuge ont encore beaucoup de travail à faire pour égaliser la production du savoir. Les participant.es au webinaire ont souligné que des initiatives telles que le partage de l’accès aux fonds de recherche, la diversification des comités éditoriaux et la création de collaborations avec les chercheur.es sous-représentés dans le but d’accroître leur représentation ne sont que quelques pas que les chercheur.es et les revues savantes peuvent faire pour décoloniser le milieu universitaire. Soyez à l’affût d’initiatives en ce sens de la part de Refuge dans les prochaines éditions de l’infolettre ou contactez-nous si vous avez des idées ou souhaitez vous impliquer!
 
 

Les articles les plus consultés – 30 derniers jours

Pittaway, E. & Bartolomei, L. (2001) Refugees, Race, and Gender: The Multiple Discrimination against Refugee Women, Refuge : Revue Canadienne Sur Les réfugiés, 19(6), 21-32. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21236

Gutiérrez Rodríguez, E. (2018). The Coloniality of Migration and the “Refugee Crisis”: On the Asylum-Migration Nexus, the Transatlantic White European Settler Colonialism-Migration and Racial Capitalism. Refuge : Revue Canadienne Sur Les réfugiés, 34(1), 16–28. https://doi.org/10.7202/1050851ar

Loescher, G. (2017). UNHCR’s Origins and Early History: Agency, Influence, and Power in Global Refugee Policy. Refuge : Revue Canadienne Sur Les réfugiés, 33(1), 77–86. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40450

 

Refuge célèbre son 40e anniversaire en 2021!

Vous savez peut-être que la revue Refuge a été fondée à l’Université York en 1981. Cela signifie que nous célébrons notre 40e anniversaire en 2021! Nous avons commencé à planifier quelque chose, alors restez à l’affût de ce que nous vous réservons pour l’occasion! Les idées sont les bienvenues.
Read all Refuge articles at https://refuge.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/refuge
About the Journal
 
Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees is a non-profit, open access, peer-reviewed academic journal. It is bilingual and welcomes submissions in both English and French. It is interdisciplinary and publishes both theoretical and empirical work from a wide range of disciplinary and regional perspectives from academics, advanced graduate students, policy-makers, and practitioners in the field of forced migration. The journal provides space for discussion of emerging themes and debates. The journal also features a book review section and occasionally publishes special issues on specific themes related to forced migration. All works submitted to Refuge must be original and must not be submitted for consideration with other journals. Refuge does not publish personal reflections on forced migration experiences, fiction, artwork or poetry. Refuge articles are indexed and abstracted widely, from the DOAJ, Érudit, Google Scholar and Scopus (Elesvier) to PAIS International (ProQuest).
***
Refuge: Revue Canadienne sur les Réfugiés est une revue académique évaluée par les pairs à but non-lucratif et à libre accès. Refuge est une revue bilingue qui publie en français et en anglais. La revue est interdisciplinaire et publie des articles théoriques et empiriques provenant d’un large éventail de disciplines académiques et perspectives géographiques. Refuge publie des articles rédigés par des chercheurs actifs dans le milieu universitaire (professeurs et étudiants diplômés), par des responsables de l’élaboration des politiques, ainsi que par des individus qui œuvre sur le terrain dans le milieu de la migration forcée. Refuge offre un espace de discussion sur les enjeux et débats émergeants se rapportant aux réfugiés et à la migration forcée. La revue comprend également une section de comptes rendus de livres, et publie occasionnellement des numéros thématiques en lien avec la migration forcée. Toutes les soumissions à Refuge doivent être originales et ne pas faire l’objet d’une soumission à une autre revue. Refuge ne publie pas des réflexions personnelles, ni de fiction, d’ouvrages artistiques, ou de poésie. Les articles de Refuge sont indexés et résumés largement, du DOAJ, Érudit, Google Scholar et Scopus (Elesvier) au PAIS International (ProQuest).
 
Facebook
Twitter
Website
Email
Copyright © 2020, Centre for Refugee Studies, York University, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is / notre adresse postale est:
Refuge
Centre for Refugee Studies, York University
8th Floor, Kaneff Tower
4700 Keele Street
Toronto, ON  M3J 1P3

Want to change how you receive these emails? / Vous souhaitez modifier la façon dont vous recevez ces e-mails?
You can
update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list. / Vous pouvez mettre à jour vos préférences ou vous désinscrire de cette liste.
 






This email was sent to <<Email Address>>
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
Centre for Refugee Studies, York University · 852 Kaneff Tower, 4700 Keele Street · Toronto, On M3J1P3 · Canada

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp