Copy

Newsletter / Bulletin

April / April 2022
Le français suit...

Table of Contents

Announcements

  1. Our spring (38.1) issue with a special focus on refuge in pandemic times and Refuge’s 40th anniversary is now out!
  2. Another Refuge accessibility & alternative article format (XML, HTML) update
  3. Refuge now available on JSTOR and HeinOnline
  4. IASFM Lisa Gilad & CARFMS essay prize(s) – deadline: May 2 and Sept 15, 2022
  5. Congratulations, comings and goings at Refuge
  6. Why open access? In brief - par2 1: Understanding different open access models
  7. Most viewed Refuge articles - last 30 days

Our spring (38.1) issue with a special focus on refuge in pandemic times and Refuge’s 40th anniversary is now out! Here are the details:

In 2021, Refuge celebrated its 40th anniversary as a journal dedicated to the study of forced migration. This issue of Refuge contains a first round of reflections on this important milestone and on the evolution of the journal from its origins as a newsletter run by Operation Lifeline in the early 1980s, to an academic, peer-reviewed, open access journal.
 
First, as Howard Adelman recalls in his contribution, although initially created for supporting and connecting individuals who had stepped up to privately sponsor (then specifically Indochinese) refugees, sponsors quickly “wanted to know more about the reasoning behind certain policies and the basic premise behind them,” which were then covered and debated in Refuge, often controversially and involving prominent political and academic voices. Second, given Refuge’s long-standing connection with the Centre for Refugee Studies (CRS), in his reflection, CRS’ current Director, Sean Rehaag, recalls how he first ran across one of Refuge as a doctoral student and subsequently ended up choosing it as a publication venue for a special issue on sanctuary he co-edited with Randy Lippert. Finally, as the previous Refuge editorial team, Christina Clark-Kazak, Johanna Reynolds and Dianne Shandy remind us in their reflections, Refuge would not have grown into the journal that it is today without the strong support of the forced migration community and a dedicated editorial team at the helm. As they remind us, the Refuge community of authors and readers now extends far beyond Canada and it is their “fresh and diverse perspectives,” often brought into the journal through collaborations with guest editors, that allows Refuge to remain cutting-edge, community-based and in many ways, non-traditional. Additional reflections will be featured in future issue(s).
 
Refuge’s 40th anniversary occurred during the ongoing global COVID-19 pandemic. This issue is further published after the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan in the fall of 2021, and during an ongoing war in Ukraine. It put a special focus on what it is like to seek refuge, undertake research, and provide services to migrants and refugees during these challenging times.
 
The issue also contains a thought-provoking set of more general articles and of course, our latest book and film reviews.
 

Editorials

 
Adelman, H. (2022) Celebrating 40 years: The Origins of RefugeRefuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.41018
 
Rehaag, S. (2022) Quarante ans de partenariat : Refuge et le Centre d’études sur les réfugié.e.s. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.41016
 
Clark-Kazak, C., Reynolds, J., & Shandy, D. Celebrating 40 Years: Reflections on Refuge: 2012-2018. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40964
 

Articles (Special Focus Section)

 
Walsh, M., Due, C., & Ziersch, A. (2022). “More important than COVID-19”: Temporary visas and compounding vulnerabilities for health and wellbeing from the COVID-19 pandemic for refugees and asylum seekers in Australia. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40840
 

Abstract


Refugees and asylum seekers on temporary visas typically experience interacting issues related to employment, financial precarity, and poor health and well-being. This research aimed to explore whether these issues were exacerbated by the social impacts of COVID-19. Interviews were conducted both prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic with 15 refugees and asylum seekers living in South Australia on temporary visas. While this research found that COVID-19 did lead to a range of negative health and other outcomes such as employment challenges, a key finding was the reiteration of temporary visas as a primary pathway through which refugees and asylum seekers experience heightened precarity and the associated pervasive negative health and well-being outcomes. The findings emphasize the importance of immigration and welfare policy.
 
Shukla, M., & Tso, L. (2022). Experiences of Tibetan Refugees in India during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40877
 

Abstract


This study explores the experiences of the 70 Tibetan refugees in India (28 male, 42 female; mean age = 30.90 years; SD = 8.11) during the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of their stress, financial anxiety, perceived discrimination, dark future expectations, and resilience. Older, married, and working refugees experienced more problems but higher resilience. Female refugees reported more nervousness and stress than male refugees. Financial anxiety and dark future expectations predicted higher stress. Overall, the findings show low to moderate levels of mental health issues and high resilience among Tibetan refugees during the pandemic and highlight the importance of cultural beliefs and practices in maintaining good mental health and resilience.
 
Martuscelli, P. (2022) Solidarity in the Time of COVID-19: Refugee experiences in Brazil. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40874
 

Abstract 


Refugees adopt solidarity actions during the pandemic of COVID-19, even after being left behind during health emergencies. This article contributes to the literature on solidarity and asylum by discussing refugees’ solidarity narratives towards vulnerable Brazilian groups, the refugee community, and the Brazilian population in general. I conducted 29 in-depth semi-structured interviews with refugees living in Brazil between March 27 and April 06, 2020. Past suffering experiences of refugees make them more empathic to other people’s suffering due to the pandemic, which creates an inclusive victim consciousness (Vollhardt, 2015) that seems to explain their solidarity narratives toward different groups.
 
Gonzalez Benson, O., Routte, I., Pimentel Walker, A. P., Yoshihama, M., & Kelly, A. (2022). Refugee-Led Organizations’ Crisis Response During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40879
 

Abstract


Scholarship on disaster response and recovery has focused on local communities as crucial in developing and implementing timely, effective, and sustainable supports. Drawing from interviews with refugee leaders conducted during the spring and summer of 2020 at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, this study examines crisis response activities of refugee-led grassroots groups, specifically within Bhutanese and Congolese refugee communities in a midwestern metropolitan area in the US resettlement context. Empirical findings illustrate how refugee-led groups provided case management, outreach, programming, and advocacy efforts to respond to the pandemic. These findings align with literature about community-based and strengths-based approaches to addressing challenges stemming from the pandemic. They also point to local embeddedness and flexibility as organizational characteristics that may have helped facilitate crisis response, thereby warranting reconsideration and re-envisioning of the role of refugee-led grassroots groups in crisis response.
 

Research notes


Gavilanes, V. A. (2022) From Ethics to Refusal: Protecting Migrant and Refugee Students from the Researcher’s Gaze. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40893
 

Abstract


This piece makes a methodological contribution to refugee studies in the context of the “ethical turn” in the field by arguing for a spectre orientation to the student voice that resituates participant knowledge as diffused rather than explicit. This orientation, as a methodological stance, goes beyond reflexivity and practices a refusal to engage in damage-centred research. Drawing from a broad theoretical and conceptual literature within the contexts of forced migration, this short essay expands the current literature focusing on procedural ethics by offering a more humanizing methodology for conducting research with migrant and refugee youth during the COVID-19 pandemic.
 
Abbas, S. (2022). Balancing Resettlement, Protection and Rapport on the Frontline: Delivering the Resettlement Assistance Program during COVID-19. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40847
 

Abstract


Drawing on my experience as a general counsellor in the Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP), I explore the impact COVID-19 has had on the initial resettlement services provided for government-assisted refugees (GARs) and on frontline workers in the field. Balancing the requirement to enforce protection measures and the need to establish rapport was one of the major challenges the pandemic posed to GAR support practices. To unpack the particularities of this challenge, I give the example of two resettlement services GARs receive upon arrival: namely, resettlement orientations and children’s education. I argue that using an intersectional lens demonstrates the pandemic’s unequal effects and how they exacerbate the vulnerabilities of GARs embarking on their resettlement journey. I hold that developing COVID-19 responses informed by intersectionality opens a space for services and policies that mitigate these effects.
 

General Articles

 
Cole, G., & Belloni, M. (2022) Return and Retreat in a Transnational World: Insights from Eritrea. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40849
 

Abstract


When refugees’ access to economic, political, and social rights cannot be guaranteed in one locale, individuals make pragmatic choices about what relationships to sustain with authorities elsewhere, even with those that caused their flight in the first place. This process of return is rarely akin to conventional repatriation, understood as the full re-establishment of the rights and responsibilities associated with citizenship (Bradley, 2013). In this paper, the authors instead propose the concept of retreat to capture the process initiated by those who are seeking to escape protracted displacement through a partial return to their country of origin, and through which individuals hope that they can assemble multiple sources of rights across several locations. Drawing from recent ethnographic research in Eritrea, the authors analyze the stories of individuals, mostly refugees, who have decided to retreat despite the lack of political change. Neither exclusively citizens nor refugees in countries of origin or asylum, research participants’ “dually absent” socio-legal position is analyzed in this article. The authors show that this rests on stratified forms of citizenship and the relational nature of different rights and statuses and argue that this position should be recognized as an additional dynamic in the literature on flight, return, and transnational citizenship.
 
Unangst, L., Casellas Connors, I., & Barone, N. State-Based Policy Supports for Refugee, Asylee, and TPS-Background Students in US Higher Education. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40819
 

Abstract


Higher education for displaced students is rarely the focus of academic literature in the context of the United States, despite 79.5 million people displaced worldwide as of December 2019 and 3 million refugees resettled in the United States since the 1970s (UNHCR, 2020). An estimated 95,000 Afghans will be resettled in the US by September 2022, and the executive branch has requested $6.4 billion in funds from Congress to support this resettlement process (Young, 2021). This represents the most concentrated resettlement in the US since the end of the Vietnam War. It is therefore clear that policy supports for displaced students represent a pressing educational equity issue. This paper applies critical policy analysis to state-level policies supporting displaced students and argues that both data gaps and policy silence characterize the current state of play.
 
Nobe-Ghelani, C., & Lumor, M. The Politics of Allyship with Indigenous Peoples in the Canadian Refugee Serving SectorRefuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40841
 

Abstract


What does it mean for the refugee-serving sector to be an ally to Indigenous Peoples? This is the entry point to our reflexive journey on Indigenous–refugee relations. In this conceptually orientated article, the authors seek to consider decolonizing praxis in the refugee-serving sector in the context of settler colonial Canada. The article examines the politics of the refugee-serving sector and argue that for it to meaningfully establish allyship with Indigenous people, we must continue to decentre the whiteness that has constructed and organized our sector. The authors highlight the tensions that exist in allyship between Indigenous and refugee communities and discuss ways to work with that tension. Three concrete approaches are suggested that may lead to decolonizing praxis in the refugee-serving sector: critical reflexivity, settler responsibility, and renewing relationships with local Indigenous communities and lands.
 

Book Reviews

 
Frazier, E. (2022). Refuge Reimagined: Biblical Kinship in Global Politics. By Mark R. Glanville and Luke Glanville. InterVarsity Press, 2021. pp. 258. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40988
 
Islam, S. (2022). No Refuge: Ethics and the Global Refugee Crisis. By Serena Parekh. Oxford University Press, 2020. pp. 247. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40986
 
Mirowski Rabelo de Souza, A. (2022). Undocumented Nationals: Between Statelessness and Citizenship. By Wendy Hunter. Cambridge University Press, 2019. pp. 71. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40989
 
Bhat, S. (2022) The Big Gamble: The Migration of Eritreans to Europe. By Milena Belloni. University of California Press, 2019. pp. 228. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40990
 
Hayes, M. Adeline Vasquez-Parra. (2022) Aider les Acadiens ? Bienfaisance et déportation 1755-1776. Bruxelles : P.I.E. Lang, 2018. pp. 201. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40987
 

Film Review

 
Belkhodja, C. (2022) Paris Stalingrad. Directors: Hind Meddeb and Thim Naccache. 2019. 88 minutes. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.41014

Another Refuge accessibility & alternative article format (XML, HTML) update


In the age of digital journal publishing, offering academic journal articles in different formats beyond pdf (which is a way of simulating the printed version of a journal article), is now industry standard. Many users prefer to discover and view journal articles online first, before choosing to download them (usually as a pdf) later. What is more, reading articles online, especially on mobile devices, is much more cumbersome if the only format available is the pdf version.
 
After transitioning to our new pdf layout with 37.2, we are now working on cleaning up some outstanding issues with the pdfs, and are making sure that their XML versions can be properly viewed through our OJS viewer and digitally harvested by our various indexing and abstracting services. We are also exploring what an HTML version might look like and whether we would also want to publish versions in epub format, which is more commonly used for e-books.
 
For academic articles, XML (Extensible Markup Language) versions are superior over HTML because they require much less mindless scrolling, allow readers to more easily jump to different sections of an article, including tables and graphs, and because of its built-in hierarchy and structure, can more easily facilitate accessibility for readers using screen readers and other assistive devices than HTML.
 
On that note, we have now started the process of retroactively back processing (or “tagging”) the pdf versions of the articles in the Refuge archives, beginning with 37.1. This is an expensive process and as a result, we can only do this tagging slowly. We have also started discussions on creating an accessible Word file template.

 

Refuge content now available through HeinOnline and JSTOR


JSTOR and HeinOnline have been hard at work over the summer and as a result, Refuge articles are now available for discovering and reading through both of their platforms - of course, our content remains open access. We are excited to be joining their communities. Given that one of JSTOR’s missions is digital preservation, they will be re-scanning our pre-digital issues for a better reading experience, so they will be added to their site later.
 

For past and future Refuge authors: IASFM Lisa Gilad & CARMS essay prize(s) – deadline: May 2 and Sept 15, 2022


The International Association for the Study of Forced Migration (IASFM) has changed the terms of its Lisa Gilad Prize. It is now open to early career researchers who have published a peer-reviewed article on forced migration in a scholarly journal (including in Refuge!) in the past two years.
 
Attention, *short* deadline: May 2, 2022. For details, visit: http://iasfm.org/blog/2022/03/30/call-for-papers-lisa-gilad-prize-2022/
 
The Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (CARFMS) is calling for submissions to its student essay contest. Undergraduate, graduate and law students can submit papers. Deadline is Sept 15, 2022. Subject to peer review, high quality short-listed papers will be considered for publication as working papers on the CARFMS website and/or in Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees. For details, visit: https://carfms.org/student-essay-contest/

Congratulations, comings and goings at Refuge


Farewell and big congratulations to Kathryn Barber, Refuge’s outgoing managing editor. Kathryn has stepped down from her position at Refuge to finish her doctoral dissertation and to take up a SSHRC funded post-doc on the Whole-COMM project, a consortium of researchers at thirteen institutions examining migrant integration in small communities in ten countries funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme.
 
Welcome to Viktoriya Vinik, a PhD student in the Department of Politics (at York University) who has taken over her role as of Feb 1! Viktoriya brings strong editorial and technical skills to the managing editor job, having previously served as the editor-in-chief of a journal at the University of Waterloo – she is even comfortable using LaTeX (a document preparation system used by many journals)! A warm welcome also to Kristy Lynn Hankewitz, our new copy editor, who already began working with some of our Refuge authors as part of our fall issue.

Why open access? In brief - part 2: Understanding different open access models


Understanding open access (#OA) publishing can be confusing. In our last newsletter, we briefly reviewed the origins and goals of the open access movement – basically, making high quality research available to everyone. Part two of our open access primer reviews the different open access publication models.
 
Recall that the open access movement began when print-based, peer reviewed journals started recreating their subscription-based models in the virtual world. Many of the same publishers that operate these pay-to-access systems now also operate so called “gold” OA journals (fully OA from the reader’s point of view),[1] or, at a minimum, offer OA publishing in journals marketed as “hybrid.”
 
If you believe in the values of open access publishing, this may all sound good at first. If even pay-to-access journals are now beginning to make at least some of their articles accessible to everyone (“hybrid journals”), then open access is clearly becoming more popular.
 
However, both, hybrid and gold OA journals typically charge authors (or their institutions or funders) a fee to “make” their article open access (article processing fees, or APCs). Depending on the publisher, this fee can be substantial and even prohibitively high, although some journals offer reduced fees for authors from certain countries. For commercial (or “for profit”) publishers, the amount will be higher than their publication costs. Particularly controversial is the fact that hybrid journals continue to generate revenue through both APCs and subscriptions.
 
Then there is green OA publishing and finally, diamond (or platinum) OA journals. Green OA refers to an author’s right to post (or self-archive) their article on a site controlled by them, their institution or an independent repository. Whether authors are legally allowed to post their article there (what version of it – preprint/postprint – and when - there may be an embargo) is governed by publication agreements. Most commercial publishers continue to require authors transfer at least some of their rights to them.
 
Diamond (sometimes also called platinum) OA journals are non-commercial, non-profit journals like Refuge, that neither charge their authors nor their readers any fees. They cover their costs through a community-drive approach, typically a mixture of external grants, volunteer work and university funds, raising questions about the long-term sustainability of this publication model.[2] Most also work with a range of open access licenses, such as the CC BY-NC 4.0 Creative Commons licence used by Refuge.
 
Bottom line: Academic journal publishing is not without costs. All journals incur costs - from submission, peer review and copy editing to layout, indexing, and archiving. A commitment to open access publishing will not make these costs disappear but rather challenges us to think about who should incur them and who should benefit from the revenue generated, and ultimately the research published.
 
[1] To check, verify the journal’s listing in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) or in Sherpa/Romeo.
[2] For a recent, extensive study of the sector, read Bosman, J., Frantsvåg, J. E., Kramer, B., Langlais, P.-C., & Proudman, V. (2021). OA Diamond Journals Study. Part 1: Findings. Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4558704
 
 

Most viewed Refuge articles - last 30 days


Anderson, B., Sharma, N., & Wright, C. (2009). Editorial: Why No Borders? Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 26(2), 5–18. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.32074
 
Brankamp, H., & Weima, Y. (2022). Introduction: Humanizing Studies of Refuge and Displacement? Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees37(2), 1–10. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40958  
 
Yousuf, B., & Berry, N. S. (2022). The Resettlement Experiences of Oromo Women Who Entered Canada as RefugeesRefuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees37(2), 78–92. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40652
 
Otunnu, O. (2002). Population Displacements: Causes and Consequences. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees21(1), 2–5. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21278
 

Land Acknowledgement

Refuge, through its affiliation with York University, acknowledges its presence on the traditional territory of many Indigenous Nations. The area known as Tkaronto has been care taken by the Anishinabek Nation, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, and the Huron-Wendat. It is now home to many First Nation, Inuit and Métis communities. We acknowledge the current treaty holders, the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation. This territory is subject of the Dish with One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, an agreement to peaceably share and care for the Great Lakes region.

Table des matières

Annonces
  1. Notre numéro du printemps (38.1), qui met l'accent sur le refuge en période de pandémie et sur le 40e anniversaire de Refuge, est désormais disponible !
  2. Une autre mise à jour de l'accessibilité de Refuge et du format alternatif des articles (XML, HTML)
  3. Refuge maintenant disponible sur JSTOR et HeinOnline
  4. Prix d’essais de l'IASFM Lisa Gilad & CARFMS - date limite : 2 mai et 15 septembre 2022
  5. Félicitations, arrivées et départs chez Refuge
  6. Pourquoi le libre accès? En bref – partie 2 : Comprendre les différents modèles d'accès libre
  7. Les articles de Refuge les plus consultés - 30 derniers jours
 

Notre numéro du printemps 2022 (38.1), qui met l'accent sur le refuge en période de pandémie et sur le 40e anniversaire de Refuge, est désormais disponible !


Voici les détails :
 
En 2021, Refuge a célébré son 40ème anniversaire en tant que journal dédié à l'étude de la migration forcée. Ce numéro de Refuge contient une première série de réflexions sur cette étape importante et sur l'évolution de la revue, depuis ses origines en tant que bulletin d'information géré par Operation Lifeline au début des années 1980, jusqu'à une revue universitaire, évaluée par des pairs et en libre accès.
 
Tout d'abord, comme le rappelle Howard Adelman dans sa contribution, bien qu'initialement créée pour soutenir et mettre en relation les personnes qui s'étaient engagées à parrainer à titre privé des réfugiés (à l'époque spécifiquement indochinois), les parrains ont rapidement "voulu en savoir plus sur le raisonnement qui sous-tendait certaines politiques et les principes de base qui les sous-tendaient", qui ont ensuite été couverts et débattus dans Refuge, souvent de manière controversée et avec la participation d'éminentes voix politiques et universitaires. Deuxièmement, étant donné le lien de longue date entre Refuge et le Centre d'études sur les réfugiés (CRS), dans sa réflexion, le directeur actuel du CRS, Sean Rehaag, se souvient qu'il est tombé pour la première fois sur un numéro de Refuge alors qu'il était étudiant au doctorat et qu'il a fini par le choisir comme lieu de publication pour un numéro spécial sur le sanctuaire qu'il a co-édité avec Randy Lippert. Enfin, comme l'équipe éditoriale précédente de Refuge, Christina Clark-Kazak, Johanna Reynolds et Dianne Shandy nous le rappellent dans leurs réflexions, Refuge ne serait pas devenu le journal qu'il est aujourd'hui sans le soutien solide de la communauté de la migration forcée et une équipe éditoriale dévouée à la barre. Comme ils nous le rappellent, la communauté d'auteurs et de lecteurs de Refuge s'étend désormais bien au-delà du Canada et ce sont leurs "perspectives fraîches et diverses", souvent introduites dans la revue par le biais de collaborations avec des rédacteurs invités, qui permettent à Refuge de rester à la pointe du progrès, axé sur le milieu communautaire et, à bien des égards, non traditionnel. D'autres réflexions seront présentées dans les prochains numéros.
 
Le 40e anniversaire de Refuge a eu lieu pendant la pandémie mondiale de la COVID-19. Ce numéro est également publié après la prise de contrôle de l'Afghanistan par les Talibans à l'automne 2021, et pendant une guerre en cours en Ukraine. Il met l'accent sur ce que c'est que de chercher un refuge, d'entreprendre des recherches et de fournir des services aux migrants et aux réfugiés pendant ces périodes difficiles.
 
Ce numéro contient également une série d'articles plus généraux qui suscitent la réflexion et, bien sûr, nos dernières critiques de livres et de films.
 

Éditoriaux

 
Adelman, H. (2022) Celebrating 40 years: The Origins of RefugeRefuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.41018
 
Rehaag, S. (2022) Quarante ans de partenariat : Refuge et le Centre d’études sur les réfugiés. Refuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.41016
 
Clark-Kazak, C., Reynolds, J., & Shandy, D. (2022) Celebrating 40 Years: Reflections on Refuge: 2012-2018. Refuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40964
 

Articles (Section spéciale)

 
Walsh, M., Due, C., & Ziersch, A. (2022). “More important than COVID-19”: Temporary visas and compounding vulnerabilities for health and wellbeing from the COVID-19 pandemic for refugees and asylum seekers in Australia. Refuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40840
 

RÉSUMÉ


Les réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile détenant un visa temporaire font généralement face à des problèmes interdépendants en ce qui concerne l’emploi, la précarité financière et la fragilité de la santé et du bien-être. Cette recherche visait à explorer dans quelle mesure ces problèmes ont été exacerbés par les impacts sociaux de la COVID-19. Des entrevues ont été menées avant et pendant la pandémie de la COVID-19 avec 15 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile vivant en Australie du Sud et détenant des visas temporaires. Bien que cette recherche ait montré que la COVID-19 a mené à une variété de conséquences négatives sur la santé ainsi que dans d’autres domaines tels que les défis liés à l’emploi, l’une des constatations clés était la réaffirmation des visas temporaires comme principale voie par laquelle les réfugiés et les demandeurs d’asile font l’expérience d’une précarité accrue et de ses effets négatifs sur la santé et le bien-être. Les résultats soulignent l’importance des politiques d’immigration et de sécurité sociale.
 
Shukla, M., & Tso, L. (2022). Experiences of Tibetan Refugees in India during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Refuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40877
 

RÉSUMÉ


Cette étude explore les expériences de 70 réfugié.es tibétain.es en Inde (28 hommes, 42 femmes; âge moyen = 30.90 ans; écart-type = 8.11) pendant la pandémie de la COVID-19 en ce qui concerne leur stress, leur anxiété financière, leur discrimination perçue, leurs attentes sombres par rapport à l’avenir et leur résilience. Les réfugié.es plus âgé.es, marié.es et occupant un emploi ont rencontré davantage de problèmes mais une plus grande résilience. Les femmes réfugiées ont signalé plus de nervosité et de stress que les hommes réfugiés. L’anxiété financière et les attentes sombres par rapport à l’avenir prédisaient un niveau de stress plus élevé. Dans l’ensemble, les résultats montrent des niveaux faibles à modérés de problèmes de santé mentale et une grande résilience chez les réfugié.es tibétain.es pendant la pandémie et soulignent l’importance des croyances et pratiques culturelles dans le maintien d’une bonne santé mentale et de la résilience.
 
Martuscelli, P. (2022) Solidarity in the Time of COVID-19: Refugee experiences in Brazil. Refuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40874
 

RÉSUMÉ


Les réfugiés adoptent des actions de solidarité pendant la pandémie de la COVID-19, même en étant laissés derrière en situation d’urgence sanitaire. Cet article contribue à la littérature sur la solidarité et l’asile en abordant les récits de solidarité des réfugiés envers les groupes vulnérables du Brésil, la communauté des réfugiés et la population brésilienne en général. J’ai mené 29 entrevues approfondies semi-structurées avec des réfugiés vivant au Brésil entre le 27 mars et le 6 avril 2020. Les expériences de souffrance passées des réfugiés les rendent plus empathiques envers la souffrance vécue par d’autres en raison de la pandémie, ce qui crée une conscience de victime inclusive (Vollhardt, 2015) qui semble expliquer leurs récits de solidarité envers différents groupes.
 
Gonzalez Benson, O., Routte, I., Pimentel Walker, A. P., Yoshihama, M., & Kelly, A. (2022). Refugee-Led Organizations’ Crisis Response During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Refuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40879
 

RÉSUMÉ


La recherche sur l’intervention et le rétablissement en cas de catastrophe s’est concentrée sur les communautés locales comme ayant un rôle crucial dans le développement et la mise en œuvre de soutiens opportuns, efficaces et durables. S’appuyant sur des entretiens avec des leaders réfugiés effectués au printemps et à l’été 2020 au début de la pandémie, cette étude examine les activités d’intervention en situation de crise menées par des groupes de base dirigés par des réfugiés, particulièrement au sein des communautés de réfugiés bhoutanais et congolais d’une région métropolitaine du Midwest dans le contexte de réinstallation des États-Unis. Les résultats empiriques illustrent comment les groupes dirigés par des réfugiés ont assuré la gestion de cas, les activités de rayonnement, la programmation ainsi que les efforts de plaidoyer en réponse à la pandémie. Ces résultats convergent avec la littérature sur une démarche de proximité et une approche axée sur les forces comme réponse aux défis issus de la pandémie. Ils soulignent également que l’intégration locale et la flexibilité sont des caractéristiques organisationnelles qui ont pu faciliter la réponse à la crise, cautionnant ainsi de reconsidérer et de ré-envisager le rôle des groupes de base dirigés par des réfugiés dans l’intervention en situation de crise.
 

Notes de Recherche

 
Gavilanes, V. A. (2022) From Ethics to Refusal: Protecting Migrant and Refugee Students from the Researcher’s Gaze. Refuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40893
 

RÉSUMÉ


Cet article apporte une contribution méthodologique aux études sur les réfugiés dans le contexte du «tournant éthique» dans le domaine en plaidant en faveur d’une orientation spectrale envers la voix étudiante qui resitue les connaissances des participants comme diffuses plutôt qu’explicites. Cette orientation, comme posture méthodologique, va au-delà de la réflexivité et pratique un refus de s'engager dans une recherche centrée sur les dommages. S’appuyant sur une large littérature théorique et conceptuelle dans les contextes de migration forcée, ce court essai élargit la littérature actuelle axée sur l’éthique procédurale en proposant une méthodologie plus humanisante pour mener des recherches auprès des jeunes migrants et réfugiés pendant la pandémie de la COVID-19.
 
Abbas, S. (2022). Balancing Resettlement, Protection and Rapport on the Frontline: Delivering the Resettlement Assistance Program during COVID-19Refuge : Revue canadienne Sur Les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40847
 

 RÉSUMÉ


Puisant dans mon expérience comme conseillère générale au sein du Programme d’aide à la réinstallation (PAR), j’explore l’impact qu’a eu la COVID-19 sur les services d’établissement initiaux offerts aux réfugiés parrainés par le gouvernement (RPG) et sur les travailleurs de première ligne dans ce domaine. La recherche d’un équilibre entre l’exigence d’appliquer les mesures de protection et le besoin d’établir un rapport était l’un des défis importants posés par la pandémie aux pratiques de soutien du PAR. Afin d’éclaircir les particularités de ce défi, je donne l’exemple de deux services d’établissement que les RPGs reçoivent à leur arrivée, soit les services d’orientation à la réinstallation et l’éducation des enfants. Je soutiens que l’emploi d’une approche intersectionnelle démontre les effets inégaux de la pandémie et la manière dont ils exacerbent les vulnérabilités des RPGs qui débutent leur parcours de réinstallation. Je considère que le développement de réponses à la COVID-19 fondées sur l’intersectionnalité ouvre la voie à des services et des politiques qui atténuent ces effets.
 

Articles généraux

 
Cole, G., & Belloni, M. Return and Retreat in a Transnational World: Insights from Eritrea. Refuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40849
 

RÉSUMÉ


Lorsque l'accès des réfugiés aux droits économiques, politiques et sociaux ne peut être garanti dans une localité, les individus font des choix pragmatiques concernant les relations à entretenir avec les autorités ailleurs, même avec celles qui ont causé leur fuite en premier lieu. Ce processus de retour est rarement comparable à un rapatriement conventionnel, compris comme le rétablissement complet des droits et responsabilités associés à la citoyenneté (Bradley, 2013). Dans cet article, les auteures proposent plutôt le concept de retraite (retreat) pour rendre compte du processus initié par ceux qui cherchent à échapper à un déplacement prolongé par un retour partiel à leur pays d'origine et par lequel les individus espèrent pouvoir rassembler de multiples sources de droits à travers plusieurs lieux. S’appuyant sur de la recherche ethnographique récente en Érythrée, les auteures analysent les histoires d’individus, pour la plupart réfugiés, qui ont décidé de se retirer malgré l’absence de changement politique. Ni exclusivement citoyens ni réfugiés dans le pays d’origine ou d’asile, la position socio-juridique « doublement absente » des participants est analysée dans cet article. Les auteures montrent qu’elle repose sur des formes de citoyenneté stratifiées ainsi que sur la nature relationnelle des divers droits et statuts et soutiennent que cette position doit être reconnue comme une dynamique supplémentaire dans la littérature sur la fuite, le retour et la citoyenneté transnationale.
 
Unangst, L., Casellas Connors, I., & Barone, N. State-Based Policy Supports for Refugee, Asylee, and TPS-Background Students in US Higher EducationRefuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40819
 

RÉSUMÉ


L’éducation supérieure pour les étudiants déplacés est rarement au centre de la littérature académique aux États-Unis, malgré le fait qu’il y ait 79,5 millions de personnes déplacées à travers le monde en date de décembre 2019 et que 3 millions de réfugiés se soient réinstallés aux États-Unis depuis les années 1970 (UNHCR, 2020). On estime que 95 000 Afghans seront réinstallés aux États-Unis en septembre 2022 et le pouvoir exécutif a demandé 6,4 milliards de dollars de fonds au Congrès afin de soutenir ce processus de réinstallation (Young, 2021). Cela représente la réinstallation la plus concentrée aux États-Unis depuis la fin de la Guerre du Vietnam. Il est donc clair que les politiques de soutien aux étudiants déplacés représentent un enjeu urgent d’équité en matière d’éducation. Cet article applique une analyse critique des politiques publiques aux politiques au niveau de l’État soutenant les étudiants déplacés et soutient que les lacunes au niveau des données et le silence politique caractérisent l’état actuel de la situation.
 
Nobe-Ghelani, C., & Lumor, M. The Politics of Allyship with Indigenous Peoples in the Canadian Refugee Serving SectorRefuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés,, 38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40841
 

RÉSUMÉ


Que signifie pour le secteur des services aux réfugiés d’être un allié des peuples autochtones? C’est le point de départ de notre parcours réflexif sur les relations entre autochtones et réfugiés. Dans cet article d’orientation conceptuelle, les auteures cherchent à examiner la praxis de décolonisation dans le secteur des services aux réfugiés dans le contexte du colonialisme canadien. L’article examine la politique du secteur des services aux réfugiés et soutient que pour qu’il établisse une alliance significative avec les peuples autochtones, nous devons continuer à décentrer la blanchité qui a construit et organisé notre secteur. Les auteures soulignent les tensions qui existent dans l’alliance entre les communautés autochtones et réfugiées et abordent certaines méthodes pour gérer ces tensions. Trois approches concrètes pouvant mener à une praxis de décolonisation dans le secteur des services aux réfugiés sont suggérées: la réflexivité critique, la responsabilité des colonisateurs et le renouvellement des relations avec les communautés et les terres autochtones locales.
 

Recensions d’ouvrages

 
Frazier, E. (2022). Refuge Reimagined: Biblical Kinship in Global Politics. By Mark R. Glanville and Luke Glanville. InterVarsity Press, 2021. pp. 258. Refuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés 38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40988
 
Islam, S. (2022). No Refuge: Ethics and the Global Refugee Crisis. By Serena Parekh. Oxford University Press, 2020. pp. 247. Refuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40986
 
Mirowski Rabelo de Souza, A. (2022). Undocumented Nationals: Between Statelessness and Citizenship. By Wendy Hunter. Cambridge University Press, 2019. pp. 71. Refuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40989
 
Bhat, S. (2022) The Big Gamble: The Migration of Eritreans to Europe. By Milena Belloni. University of California Press, 2019. pp. 228. Refuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40990
 
Hayes, M. Adeline Vasquez-Parra. (2022) Aider les Acadiens ? Bienfaisance et déportation 1755-1776. Bruxelles : P.I.E. Lang, 2018. pp. 201. Refuge : Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40987
 

Comptes-rendus de films

 
Belkhodja, C. (2022) Paris Stalingrad. Directors: Hind Meddeb and Thim Naccache. 2019. 88 minutes. Refuge : Revue Canadienne Sur Les réfugiés, 38(1). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.41014
 

Une autre mise à jour de l'accessibilité de Refuge et du format alternatif des articles (XML, HTML)


À l'ère de la publication numérique des revues, proposer des articles de revues universitaires dans différents formats autres que le pdf (qui est une façon de simuler la version imprimée d'un article de revue) est désormais la norme dans l'industrie. De nombreux utilisateurs préfèrent d'abord découvrir et consulter les articles de revues en ligne, avant de choisir de les télécharger (généralement en format pdf) par la suite. De plus, la lecture d'articles en ligne, notamment sur des appareils mobiles, est beaucoup plus fastidieuse si le seul format disponible est le format pdf.
 
Après la transition vers notre nouvelle mise en page pdf avec le numéro 37.2, nous travaillons maintenant à résoudre certains problèmes en suspens avec les pdf et nous nous assurons que leurs versions XML peuvent être correctement visualisées par notre visualiseur OJS et récoltées numériquement par nos différents services d'indexation et de résumé. Nous examinons également ce à quoi pourrait ressembler une version HTML ainsi que la possibilité de publier des versions en format epub, qui est plus couramment utilisé pour les livres électroniques.
 
Pour les articles universitaires, le format XML (Extensible Markup Language) est supérieur au HTML parce qu'il nécessit beaucoup moins de défilement inutile, parce qu’il permet aux lecteurs de passer plus facilement aux différentes sections d'un article, y compris aux tableaux et aux graphiques, et parce qu’il permet une meilleure accessibilité aux lecteurs utilisant des lecteurs d’écran et d’autres dispositifs d’assistance en raison de sa hiérarchie et sa structure intégrée.
 
À ce propos, nous avons entamé le processus de rétrotraitement (ou "balisage") rétroactif des versions pdf des articles des archives de Refuge, à partir du numéro 37.1. Il s'agit d'un processus coûteux et, par conséquent, nous ne pouvons effectuer ce balisage que lentement. Nous avons également entamé des discussions sur la création d'un modèle de fichier Word accessible.


Refuge rejoint HeinOnline et JSTOR


JSTOR et HeinOnline ont travaillé fort pendant l'été et, par conséquent, les articles de Refuge sont maintenant disponibles pour la découverte et la lecture sur ces deux plateformes - bien sûr, notre contenu reste en accès libre. Nous sommes ravis de rejoindre leurs communautés. Étant donné que l'une des missions de JSTOR est la préservation numérique, JSTOR s’engage à re-numériser nos numéros pré-numériques pour une meilleure expérience de lecture, ils seront donc ajoutés à leur site ultérieurement.

 

Pour les auteurs passés et futurs de Refuge: Prix IASFM Lisa Gilad & CARMS - date limite: 2 mai et 15 septembre 2022

 

L'Association internationale pour l'étude de la migration forcée (IASFM) a modifié les conditions d'attribution de son prix Lisa Gilad. Il est désormais ouvert aux chercheurs en début de carrière qui ont publié un article sur la migration forcée dans une revue scientifique (y compris dans Refuge !) au cours des deux dernières années.
 
Attention, date limite *imminente* : 2 mai 2022. Pour plus de détails, visitez : http://iasfm.org/blog/2022/03/30/call-for-papers-lisa-gilad-prize-2022/ 
 
L'Association canadienne des études sur les réfugiés et la migration forcée (CARFMS) lance un appel à candidatures pour son concours de rédaction pour étudiants. Les étudiants de premier cycle, de deuxième cycle et de droit peuvent soumettre des articles. La date limite est le 15 septembre 2022. Sous réserve d'un examen par les pairs, les articles de haute qualité retenus seront considérés pour être publiés comme documents de travail sur le site Web de CARFMS et/ou dans Refuge. Pour plus de détails, visitez le site : https://carfms.org/student-essay-contest/  


Félicitations, départs et arrivées chez Refuge

 
Adieu et grandes félicitations à Kathryn Barber, la rédactrice en chef sortante de Refuge. Kathryn a quitté son poste à Refuge pour terminer sa thèse de doctorat et prendre un poste postdoctoral financé par le CRSH dans le cadre du projet Whole-COMM, un consortium de chercheurs de treize institutions examinant l'intégration des migrants dans de petites communautés dans dix pays, financé par le programme de recherche et d'innovation Horizon 2020 de l'Union européenne.
 
Bienvenue à Viktoriya Vinik, étudiante en doctorat au département de politique (à l'Université de York), qui a pris ses fonctions le 1er février ! Viktoriya apporte de solides compétences éditoriales et techniques au poste de rédactrice en chef, ayant déjà été rédactrice en chef d'une revue à l'Université de Waterloo - elle est même à l'aise avec LaTeX (un système de préparation de documents utilisé par de nombreuses revues) ! Nous souhaitons également la bienvenue à Kristy Lynn Hankewitz, notre nouvelle réviseure, qui a déjà commencé à travailler avec certains auteurs de Refuge dans le cadre de notre numéro d'automne.
 

Pourquoi le libre accès ? En bref - partie 2 : Comprendre les différents modèles d'accès ouvert

 
Comprendre la publication en libre accès (#OA) peut être déroutant. Dans notre dernière lettre d'information, nous avons brièvement passé en revue les origines et les objectifs du mouvement du libre accès - en gros, mettre la recherche de haute qualité à la disposition de tous. La deuxième partie de notre introduction au libre accès passe en revue les différents modèles de publication en libre accès.
 
Rappelons que le mouvement du libre accès a débuté lorsque des revues imprimées et évaluées par les pairs ont commencé à recréer leurs modèles d'abonnement dans le monde virtuel. Bon nombre des éditeurs qui exploitent ces systèmes d'accès payant exploitent également des revues en libre accès dites "gold" (entièrement en libre accès du point de vue du lecteur)[1] ou, au minimum, offrent une publication en libre accès dans des revues commercialisées comme "hybrides".
 
Si vous croyez aux valeurs de l'édition en libre accès, tout cela peut sembler bon au premier abord. Si même les revues à accès payant commencent maintenant à rendre au moins une partie de leurs articles accessibles à tous ("revues hybrides"), alors le libre accès devient clairement plus populaire.
 
Cependant, les revues hybrides et les revues en libre accès font généralement payer aux auteurs (ou à leurs institutions ou bailleurs de fonds) des frais pour "rendre" leurs articles en libre accès (frais de traitement des articles ou APC). Selon l'éditeur, ces frais peuvent être substantiels et même prohibitifs, bien que certaines revues offrent des frais réduits pour les auteurs de certains pays. Pour les éditeurs commerciaux (ou "à but lucratif"), le montant sera supérieur à leurs coûts de publication. Le fait que les revues hybrides continuent à générer des revenus à la fois par les APC et les abonnements est particulièrement controversé.
 
Il y a ensuite l'édition OA verte et, enfin, les revues OA de diamant (ou de platine). Le «Green OA» fait référence au droit d'un auteur de publier (ou d'auto-archiver) son article sur un site contrôlé par lui-même, son institution ou un dépôt indépendant. La question de savoir si les auteurs sont légalement autorisés à y publier leur article (quelle version de celui-ci - préimpression/postimpression - et quand - il peut y avoir un embargo) est régie par les accords de publication.[2] La plupart des éditeurs commerciaux continuent d'exiger que les auteurs leur transfèrent au moins une partie de leurs droits.
 
Les revues OA de diamant (parfois aussi appelées platine) sont des revues non commerciales, sans but lucratif, comme Refuge, qui ne font payer ni leurs auteurs ni leurs lecteurs. Elles couvrent leurs coûts grâce à une approche communautaire, généralement un mélange de subventions externes, de travail bénévole et de fonds universitaires, ce qui soulève des questions quant à la durabilité à long terme de ce modèle de publication.  La plupart d'entre eux travaillent également avec une série de licences d'accès libre, comme la licence CC BY-NC 4.0 Creative Commons utilisée par Refuge.
 
Conclusion : L'édition de revues académiques n'est pas sans coût. Toutes les revues ont des coûts - de la soumission,  l'examen par les pairs et l'édition à la mise en page, l'indexation et l'archivage. Un engagement en faveur de la recherche et de la publication en libre accès ne fera pas disparaître ces coûts, mais nous incite plutôt à réfléchir à qui doit les assumer et à qui doit bénéficier des revenus générés, et finalement la recherche publiée.
 
[1] Pour vérifier, consultez la liste de la revue dans le Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) ou dans Sherpa/Romeo.
[2] Pour une étude récente et approfondie du secteur, lire Bosman, J., Frantsvåg, J. E., Kramer, B., Langlais, P.-C., & Proudman, V. (2021). OA Diamond Journals Study. Part 1: Findings. Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4558704
 
 
 

Les articles de Refuge les plus consultés - 30 derniers jours

 
Anderson, B., Sharma, N., & Wright, C. (2009). Editorial: Why No Borders? Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 26(2), 5–18. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.32074
 
Brankamp, H., & Weima, Y. (2022). Introduction: Humanizing Studies of Refuge and Displacement? Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees37(2), 1–10. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40958  
 
Yousuf, B., & Berry, N. S. (2022). The Resettlement Experiences of Oromo Women Who Entered Canada as RefugeesRefuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees37(2), 78–92. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40652
 
Otunnu, O. (2002). Population Displacements: Causes and Consequences. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees21(1), 2–5. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21278
 


Déclaration de reconnaissance des territoires traditionnels

Refuge, par son affiliation avec l’Université York reconnaît sa présence sur le territoire traditionnel de nombreuses nations autochtones. La région connue comme Tkaronto a été préservée par la nation anishinabek, la Confédération Haudenosaunee, les Hurons-Wendats et les Métis. Elle est désormais le foyer d’un grand nombre de peuples autochtones. Nous reconnaissons les titulaires actuels du traité, la première Nation des Mississaugas de New Credit. Ce territoire est soumis au traité de la ceinture wampum (« Dish with One Spoon »), entente définissant le partage et la préservation pacifiques de la région des Grands Lacs.
Read all Refuge articles at https://refuge.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/refuge
About the Journal
 
Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees is a non-profit, open access, peer-reviewed academic journal. It is bilingual and welcomes submissions in both English and French. It is interdisciplinary and publishes both theoretical and empirical work from a wide range of disciplinary and regional perspectives from academics, advanced graduate students, policy-makers, and practitioners in the field of forced migration. The journal provides space for discussion of emerging themes and debates. The journal also features a book review section and occasionally publishes special issues on specific themes related to forced migration. All works submitted to Refuge must be original and must not be submitted for consideration with other journals. Refuge does not publish personal reflections on forced migration experiences, fiction, artwork or poetry. Refuge articles are indexed and abstracted widely, from the DOAJ, Érudit, Google Scholar and Scopus (Elesvier) to PAIS International (ProQuest).
***
Refuge: Revue Canadienne sur les Réfugiés est une revue académique évaluée par les pairs à but non-lucratif et à libre accès. Refuge est une revue bilingue qui publie en français et en anglais. La revue est interdisciplinaire et publie des articles théoriques et empiriques provenant d’un large éventail de disciplines académiques et perspectives géographiques. Refuge publie des articles rédigés par des chercheurs actifs dans le milieu universitaire (professeurs et étudiants diplômés), par des responsables de l’élaboration des politiques, ainsi que par des individus qui œuvre sur le terrain dans le milieu de la migration forcée. Refuge offre un espace de discussion sur les enjeux et débats émergeants se rapportant aux réfugiés et à la migration forcée. La revue comprend également une section de comptes rendus de livres, et publie occasionnellement des numéros thématiques en lien avec la migration forcée. Toutes les soumissions à Refuge doivent être originales et ne pas faire l’objet d’une soumission à une autre revue. Refuge ne publie pas des réflexions personnelles, ni de fiction, d’ouvrages artistiques, ou de poésie. Les articles de Refuge sont indexés et résumés largement, du DOAJ, Érudit, Google Scholar et Scopus (Elesvier) au PAIS International (ProQuest).
 
Facebook
Twitter
Website
Email
Copyright © 2020, Centre for Refugee Studies, York University, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is / notre adresse postale est:
Refuge
Centre for Refugee Studies, York University
8th Floor, Kaneff Tower
4700 Keele Street
Toronto, ON  M3J 1P3

Want to change how you receive these emails? / Vous souhaitez modifier la façon dont vous recevez ces e-mails?
You can
update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list. / Vous pouvez mettre à jour vos préférences ou vous désinscrire de cette liste.
 






This email was sent to <<Email Address>>
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
Centre for Refugee Studies, York University · 852 Kaneff Tower, 4700 Keele Street · Toronto, On M3J1P3 · Canada

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp