Copy

Newsletter / Bulletin

November / Novembre 2021
Le français suit...

Table of Contents

Announcements

  1. Our 2021 fall (37.2) issue with a special focus on humanizing studies of refuge and displacement is out now!
  2. Our next (winter) issue: special focus on COVID & beginnings of 40th anniversary celebrations- a sneak peak
  3. New 40th anniversary “look” for Refuge and next accessibility update
  4. Refuge added to HeinOnline and JSTOR
  5. Refuge as virtual exhibitor at IASFM18 – a look back
  6. Tweet, tweet, tweety: Refuge now with its own Twitter handle!
  7. Congratulations, comings and goings at Refuge
  8. Why open access? In brief - part 1: history of the open access movement
  9. Most viewed Refuge articles - last 30 days

Our 2021 fall (37.2) issue with a special focus on humanizing studies of refuge and displacement is out now! Here are the details:

Special Focus on Humanizing Studies of Refuge and Displacement

Brankamp, H. and Weima, Y (2021). Introduction: Humanizing Studies of Refuge and Displacement? Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40958

The point of departure for this special focus section is the contributors' shared concern about the dehumanising politics and sentiments in relation to refugees and displaced populations today. This includes not only violent border and (im)migration regimes, but also an embedded discursive violence which portrays people on the move accordingly as 'swarms', 'floods', or 'disease'. Hence, some strands in the current literatures on refugees and displacement have made the case for economic empowerment and refugee entrepreneurship as solutions for long-term displacement and precarious citizenship regimes. However, advocates of these (often) policy-oriented responses continue to promote the hosting of refugees as an economic opportunity for states rather than a burden, and thus formulate it as a rational decision within the neoliberal market logic. Humanitarian organisations like the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) are themselves pursuing partnerships with international financial institutions (such as the World Bank), private businesses, multinational corporations, investors, and research institutions. This has once again inadvertently played into and reinforced the dehumanisation of displaced people globally and failed to confront the more systemic underpinnings of displacement, including global capitalism, imperialism, coloniality, racism, xenophobia, and eroding citizenship rights. Critical scholars have a long tradition of intervening in these debates with more emancipatory approaches that champion social justice and equality.

The special focus section in this issue showcases some of this scholarship. It consists of seven short reflections, an introduction and a commentary.

Daley, P. (2021). Ethical Considerations for Humanizing Refugee Research Trajectories. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40808

Abstract
This paper argues that ethical responsibilities in refugee studies have focused on fieldwork, yet ethics ought to be applied to the research problematic—the aims, questions, and concepts—as potentially implicated in the production of harm. Using an example from Tanzania, I argue that policy has largely shaped the language, categories investigated, and interpretive frames of refugee research, and this article advocates greater attention to historical and contemporary racialization processes underpinning humanitarian principles and practices, and how they might contribute to exclusion and ontological anxieties among refugees in the Global South. By expanding our conceptualization of ethical responsibilities, researchers can better explore the suitability, and the implications for the refugee communities, of the approach that they have adopted and whether they contribute or challenge the racialization and dehumanization of people seeking refuge.

Weima, Y. (2021). Is it commerce?”: Dehumanization in the framing of “refugees as resources. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40796

Abstract
The idea that “refugees are resources” has been promoted as countering the dehumanization that frames refugees as burdens or security threats. But is framing people as resources truly dehumanizing? Resource theorists have highlighted how Modern Western conceptions of what resources are depends on a distinction between the human and the non-human. This logic is similar to, and in originates in the same époque as, racialized hierarchies of humanity. State appraisal and management of human labour and mobility continues to be shaped by race and perceptions of productive value in economistic terms, just as the value of resources varies, and has always been social and political. This intervention highlights the perspective of a refugee who traces continuities between animalizing experiences, and being called a resource—in that a resource can be sold or traded across with no input into its future. Refugees can and do meaningfully contribute to the communities and countries in which they live, but the “resources” lens curtails a truly humanizing perspective on refugees' lives.

Abushama, H. (2021). Refugee Agency, Biopolitics and a New World. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40794

Abstract
This short intervention starts by discussing Giorgio Agamben’s theoretical formulation of ‘bare life,’ popular in refugee studies. Thinking with the case study of Palestinian refugee camps, particularly in the West Bank, it argues that there are clear limitations to the discourse of biopolitics and bare life. I argue that ‘bare life’ neither accounts for the multilayered relations of power, particularly colonialism, slavery, and indigenous genocide, that systemically make certain populations more susceptible to its power than others. Nor does it account for the modes of sociality of those who are systemically relegated to its sphere. I conclude by working through some of the theoretical formulations around body politics from the field of Black studies, particularly Alexander Weheliye’s (2014) concept of the flesh, in order to explore new directions they may point us towards in refugee studies.

Carpi, E. (2021). What Does a Humane Infrastructure for Research Look Like? Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40781

Abstract
In this intervention, I make two main suggestions to humanize refugee research. First, the tendency to select “research hot spots” as field sites—where researchers tend to approach the same interviewees and spaces—should not only be called out and avoided but battled against. Second, I suggest that refugee research should collaborate directly with other studies of social, political, and economic phenomena not in an effort to make displacement the sine qua non for doing research but, instead, only one of the many conditions a human being can inhabit within receiving societies. Pursuing this aim will be easier when studies on forced migration do not become compartmentalized and develop in isolation from other disciplines and research groups.

Brankamp, H. (2021) Demarcating Boundaries: Against the “Humanitarian Embrace.” Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40791

Abstract
Recent years have seen renewed calls for bridging the “gap” between the worlds of policy-makers, humanitarian practitioners, and researchers in the social sciences and humanities. This has resulted in a growth of partnerships between academics, aid organizations, governments, and businesses with the aim of joining forces to help those in need. This paper responds critically to these developments and questions the seemingly common sense logic behind attempts to forge ever closer collaborations across institutional boundaries. It argues that the humanitarian arena, despite its heterogeneity, is by no means a level playing field in which the meanings, power structures, and practices of aid are ever truly “open” for negotiation. Bridging divides has often served as a way of consolidating the institutional and epistemic hegemony of humanitarian actors and inadvertently delegitimized critical scholarship seeking more structural change. Scholars in refugee and forced migration studies have hereby been engulfed in a tightening “humanitarian embrace”. This paper argues that in order to fulfil a more radical scholarly commitment to social justice, anti-violence, and equality, it is time to demarcate the boundaries between institutionalized humanitarianism and politically engaged, slow, and insurgent forms of research that center solidarity with marginalized, racialized, encamped, and displaced migrants themselves. Towards this end, I propose infiltration, slow scholarship, and accompaniment as alternative methodologies for research in humanitarian spaces.

Darling, J. (2021) The cautious politics of “humanising” refugee research. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40798

Abstract
In this intervention, I reflect on what it may mean to ‘humanise’ refugee research. The assumption often made is that ‘humanising’ can arise through a concern with the particularity of the individual, through drawing from ‘the mass’ the narrative of the singular and employing this as a means to identify, empathise, and potentially understand others. Yet such a move risks a reliance on creating relations of empathy and compassion that elide political responses to dehumanisation, and often relies on a universalist assumption of what constitutes the category of ‘the human’, an assumption that has been critically challenged by postcolonial writing.

Bakewell, O. (2021) Humanising refugee research in a turbulent world. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40795

Abstract
This essay adopts a critical perspective of the idea of humanising refugee research. It argues that much social scientific research is intrinsically dehumanising, as it simplifies and reduces human experience to categories and models that are amenable to analysis. Attempts to humanise research may productively challenge and unsettle powerful and dominant hegemonic structures that frame policy and research on forced migration. However, it may replace them with new research frameworks, now imbued authority as representing more authentic or real-life experiences. Rather than claiming the moral high ground of humanising research, the more limited, and perhaps more honest ambition should be to recognise the inevitable dehumanisation embedded in refugee research and seek to dehumanise differently.

Anderson, C. Humanizing Studies of Refuge and Displacement—Considering Complicity, Contingency, and Compromise. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2).  https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40971

While the contributions to the special focus section recognize that they embody “the inherent fragility, uncertainty, and polysemy” that defines their pursuit, and while the interventions included vary in the encouraged “precise strategies, political alliances, and discourses necessary for this endeavour” (Brankamp & Weima), as a collection, they contribute to an ongoing and important conversation about the meaning and purpose of critical scholarship and its potential to reflect and improve the lives of refugees and other forced migration populations. This commentary offers some thoughts on complicity, contingency, and compromise. They are prompted by the interventions included here, they extend from and relate to broader discussions within the field and indeed beyond to the social sciences on the relative merits and techniques of pursuing change within the world that is and seeking a more radical and transformative process of worldmaking.

General section


Yousuf, B. and Berry, N.S. (2021). The Resettlement Experiences of Oromo Women Who Entered Canada as Refugees. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40652

Abstract
A growing body of literature shows that gender-based experiences produce different circumstances for men and women who become refugees and thereafter. This article sought to contribute to this literature by investigating the challenges faced by Oromo women who have immigrated to Canada as refugees. Toward this end, we interviewed six Oromo women in Western Canada regarding what led them to leave Ethiopia, their experiences as refugees seeking asylum, and their struggles with resettlement and integration. The findings reveal that Oromo women share the challenges endured by their male counterparts, but also are victims of gender-based subjugation at each stage of emigration.

Richard, M. (2021). Soutenir sa famille en contexte de migration forcée en tant que femme syrienne établie au Québec et au Liban : entre vulnérabilités et responsabilités ambivalentes. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40765

Abstract
Although the vulnerability of refugee women is a cornerstone of access to protection, it is rarely defined beyond its common-sense meaning - the risk of suffering harm. This article presents the results of an empirical research where 12 life histories were collected from Syrian refugee women responsible for supporting their families in Lebanon (7) and Québec (5). The analysis mobilized the concept of ambivalent vulnerability (Oliviero, 2016) and showed that women and their relatives were certainly exposed to forms of adversity, but also to transformative opportunities and to elements of continuity with their life trajectories.

Leanza, Y., Rocque, R., Brisset, C. and Gagnon, S. (2021). Training and Integrating Public Service Interpreters in a Refugee Health Clinic: A Mixed-Method Approach to Evaluate an Innovative Program. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40691

Abstract
Language barriers can harm refugees’ health, and trained interpreters are a solution to overcome these barriers in all health consultations. This study trained interpreters and integrated them in a refugee clinic. Nepali-speaking migrants were recruited and underwent 50 hours of training to serve as interpreters for recently arrived Bhutanese refugees in Quebec City. To evaluate the project, mixed data were collected. At baseline and follow-up, patients’ health (as perceived by practitioners) and satisfaction were evaluated. Interpreters and practitioners were also interviewed and took part in joint discussion workshops. Patients’ health remained stable but, interestingly, patients were slightly less satisfied at follow-up. Practitioners and interpreters described both benefits and difficulties of the program. For example, integrating interpreters within the clinical team allowed for better collaboration and mutual knowledge of cultures. Challenges included work overload, conflicts between interpreters and practitioners, and role conflicts for interpreters. Overall, the full-time integration of trained interpreters in the clinic facilitated communication and case administration. This practice could be especially beneficial for refugee clients. In future interventions, interpreter roles should be better clarified to patients and practitioners, and particular attention should be paid to selection criteria for interpreters.

Arvisais, O., Charland, P., Audet, F. and Skelling-Desmeules, Y. (2021). Academic Persistence for Students Involved in the Accelerated Education Program in Dadaab Refugee Camp. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40737

Abstract
The academic community has highlighted the lack of research into accelerated education programs (AEPs) in refugee camps. Furthermore, AEPs take different forms in different countries. Generally speaking, however, several AEPs in different parts of the world are known for their low attendance rates. Accordingly, this article presents the key barriers causing absenteeism or preventing students from continuing their education within the program in Dadaab Refugee Camp. Our study shows that humanitarian action itself plays a significant role in pupil academic persistence. Also, flexible schedules are not a solution to absenteeism in AEP.

Huang, L.-S. (2021). “I Have Big, Big, Big Dream!”: Realigning Instruction with the Language-Learning Needs of Adult Syrians with Refugee Experience in Canada. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40800

Abstract
This article reports on a study involving multiple sources of data that captured adult Syrian refugee learners’ unique language-learning needs by developing and implementing needs assessment surveys; conducting in-depth, semi-structured interviews with the learners and teachers; and analyzing the learners’ oral production. The insights gained from the analysis of direct data (the learners’ oral production) and indirect data (content analysis using NVivo 12 Plus of the learning needs reported by learners and teachers) are intended to inform the work of researchers conducting needs assessment as well as the practices that are applicable within and beyond the Canadian context of instructors and material developers working with English-language learners who are refugees.

Book reviews


Refuge in a Moving World: Tracing Refugee and Migrant Journeys across Disciplines. Edited by Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh. London: UCL Press, 2020, pp. 529. Reviewed by Irene Tuzi. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40956

Post-Genocide Rwandan Refugees: Why They Refuse to Return ‘Home’: Myths and Realities. By Masako Yonekawa. Singapore: Springer, 2020, pp.136. Reviewed by Naoko Hashimoto. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40952

Irregular Citizenship, Immigration, and Deportation. By Peter Nyers. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, pp. 172. Reviewed by Bahar Banaei. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40955

Border Jumping and Migration Control in Southern Africa by Francis Musoni, Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, pp. 218. Reviewed by René Bogović. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40949

Europe and the Refugee Crisis. By Frances Trix, London, UK: I.B. Tauris, 2018, pp. 266. Reviewed by Robert L. Larruina. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40950
 
 

Film Review


For Sama. Directors: Waad Al-Kateab, and Edward Watts. July 2019, 96 minutes. Reviewed by Serdar Kaya. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40953


Our next (winter) issue (37.3) 2021: special focus on the COVID-19 pandemic & Refuge 40th anniversary reflections, round one - sneak peak


Our next issue (37.3) coming in the winter of 2021, will put the focus on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on forced migration around the globe. It will feature longer articles as well as shorter reflections. It will also include some reflections and congratulations on Refuge’s 40th anniversary from some of Refuge’s past editorial teams. This “special coverage” will continue in our spring 2022 issue.
 


New 40th anniversary “look” for Refuge and next accessibility update


The fall issue features Refuge’s new, refreshed “look.” We hope you like it! In honour of its long history in the field and its origins as a community-based newsletter, the new layout retains its iconic, two column format. To signal Refuge’s standing along other peer-reviewed journals in the international, interdisciplinary field of forced migration studies, the pdf version otherwise features a more current, industry-standard look.
 
Behind the scenes, our new publishing platform facilitates generating high quality metadata that is more easily indexed and linked with major abstracting and indexing services, from Google Scholar to Scopus and others, which, we hope, will lead to more citations and readers.
 
Our new publishing platform also allows us to output Refuge articles in other formats, such as html, epub and xml. Stay tuned as we launch Refuge articles in those formats in the near future!
 
The transition to our new layout will eventually also lead to a more accessible version of Refuge articles. We continue to work with our accessibility auditors to determine the best way forward and are exploring ways to retroactively back process (or “tag”) the pdf versions of the articles in the Refuge archives all the way back to 2012.
 

Refuge added to HeinOnline and JSTOR


Over the summer, we concluded agreements with two major U.S. based database providers, HeinOnline, a legal services content provider (that includes Canadian and international content), and JSTOR, a humanities and social science-focused, digital archive.
 
Both platforms will feature Refuge as part of their content, allow for article downloading as well as full text searching. Of course, Refuge content access through either platform remains open access. We are excited to be joining their communities.


Refuge participation in IASFM18 Virtual Exhibition


Refuge was honoured to participate in the International Association for the Study of Forced Migration’s (IASFM) Virtual Exhibition for academic publishers this summer. Hosted by the University of Ghana and held virtually from July 26-30, the theme of the conference was Disrupting Theory, Unsettling Practice: Towards Transformative Forced Migration Scholarship. Our virtual session was well-attended; and we were very pleased to have the opportunity to discuss our editorial guidelines and process with current and potential Refuge contributors.  We encourage conference participants who have transformed their conference papers into articles, particularly those authors from the Global South, to consider submitting their work to us.


Tweet, tweet, tweety: Refuge now with its own Twitter handle!


In case you’re on Twitter, over the summer, Refuge joined the Twitter community with its own Twitter account and Twitter handle @RefugeJournal. Although we continue to greatly benefit from our link to York’s Centre for Refugee Studies when it comes to all things, including social media (@CRSYorkU), it will be great to branch out into the #Twitterverse a bit more. Please follow us if you are a fellow Tweety bird!


Congratulations, comings and goings at Refuge


Touts nos félicitations to our co-editor, Pierre-André Thériault, for successfully defending his doctoral dissertation! Dr. Thériault has since taken up a SSHRC-funded post-doc at the University of Toronto’s law school. A warm welcome and thank you to Fiona Harris, a York undergraduate student in Global Health, who joined the Refuge editorial team over the summer as our first work-study student and hard-working editorial assistant. We are fortunate to be able to keep her for a bit longer, while she finishes up her (second) B.A.! Farewell and thank you to our long-standing copy-editor Ian McKenzie at Paragraphics who is retiring from working for Refuge. Congratulations (and farewell) to Megan Bradley, one of our editorial board members, who has taken up the role of co-editor of the Journal for Refugee Studies (JRS) and who will be stepping down from the Refuge editorial board.


Why open access? In brief - part 1: history and expansion of the open access movement


Understanding open access publishing can be confusing. Why does it matter? And why should you care? Here is a first primer on the origins of the movement.
 
The open access movement began when print-based, peer reviewed journals started moving online. As part of this move, publishers started to implement a virtual, paid access system (“paywall”) similar to that already in place for accessing subscription-based print journals.
 
The creation of a virtual paywall system exacerbated existing inequalities in accessing high quality, academic resources for scholars in the Global South and for those not affiliated with a university even further. The Budapest Open Access Initiative (sponsored by the Open Society Foundation), released for signatures in 2002, invited scholars and organizations to stand up against these inequalities created by such a for-profit, “closed” publication model (that incidentally, does pay neither peer reviewers nor authors and in the case of the latter, typically also restricts access to their own work by transferring the copyright to the publishers).
 
Since then, the open access movement has grown and flourished. Many funders (among them the Social Science and Research Council of Canada, the European Commission and the U.S. National Institute of Health) now mandate that research carried out with the help of their funds be made available open access. The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) now lists over 17,000 journals that meet their quality indicators and publish open access, peer-reviewed research findings, including Refuge.
 

Most viewed Refuge articles - last 30 days


Muller, B. (2004). Globalization, Security, Paradox: Towards a Refugee Biopolitics. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 22(1), 49–57. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21317

Anderson, B., Sharma, N., & Wright, C. (2009). Editorial: Why No Borders? Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 26(2), 5–18. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.32074

Pittaway, E. & Bartolomei, L. (2001.) Refugees, Race, and Gender: The Multiple Discrimination against Refugee Women. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 19(6), 21-32. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21236

Flood, L. U. (1997). Sardar Sarovar Dam: A Case Study of Development-induced Environmental Displacement. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 16(3), 12–17. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21921

 

Table des matières

Annonces
  1. Notre numéro de l’automne 2021 (37.2) avec une section spéciale sur l’humanisation des études sur le refuge et le déplacement est maintenant disponible!
  2. Notre prochain numéro (hiver 2021): section spéciale sur la COVID et début des célébrations du 40e anniversaire de Refuge - un aperçu
  3. Un nouveau «look» pour le 40e anniversaire de Refuge et prochaine mise à jour en termes d’accessibilité
  4. Refuge rejoint HeinOnline et JSTOR
  5. Refuge comme exposant virtuel lors de la conférence IASFM18
  6. Tweet, tweet, tweety: Refuge a maintenant son propre identifiant!
  7. Félicitations, départs et arrivées chez Refuge
  8. Pourquoi le libre accès? En bref – partie 1 : histoire et croissance du mouvement pour le libre accès
  9. Les articles de Refuge les plus consultés - 30 derniers jours
 

Notre numéro de l’automne 2021 (37.2) avec une section spéciale sur l’humanisation des études sur le refuge et le déplacement est maintenant disponible!


Section spéciale sur l’humanisation des études sur le refuge et le déplacement
 
Brankamp, H. and Weima, Y (2021). Introduction: Humanizing Studies of Refuge and Displacement? Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40958

Le point de départ de cette section spéciale est la préoccupation que partagent les contributeurs par rapport aux politiques et opinions déshumanisantes au sujet des réfugiés et des personnes déplacées aujourd'hui. Ceci comprend non seulement les régimes frontaliers et migratoires violents, mais aussi la violence discursive dépeignant les personnes en déplacement en termes de «hordes», de «vagues» et de «maladie». Ainsi, certains pans de la littérature actuelle sur les réfugiés et le déplacement ont plaidé en faveur de l'autonomisation économique et de l'entrepreneuriat des réfugiés comme solutions au déplacement sur le long terme et aux régimes de citoyenneté précaires. Cependant, les partisans de ces réponses (souvent) axées sur les politiques continuent de promouvoir l'accueil des réfugiés comme une opportunité économique plutôt qu'un fardeau pour les États, le formulant ainsi comme une décision rationnelle dans le contexte d'une logique de marché néolibérale. Les organisations humanitaires telles que l'Agence des Nations Unies pour les Réfugiés (UNHRC) entretiennent elles-mêmes des partenariats avec des institutions financières internationales (telles que la Banque mondiale), des entreprises privées, des corporations multinationales, des investisseurs et des institutions de recherche. Ceci, une fois de plus, a fait le jeu de la déshumanisation des personnes déplacées globalement et l’a renforcée, tout en échouant à confronter les soubassements systémiques du déplacement, qui incluent le capitalisme global, l'impérialisme, la colonialité, le racisme, la xénophobie et l'effritement des droits en matière de citoyenneté. Les intellectuels critiques ont une longue tradition d'intervention dans ces débats à partir d'approches plus émancipatrices promouvant la justice sociale et l'égalité.
 
Cette section spéciale met de l'avant certains de ces travaux. Elle consiste en sept courtes réflexions, une introduction et un commentaire.
 
 Daley, P. (2021) Ethical Considerations for Humanizing Refugee Research Trajectories. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40808
 
Résumé
Cet article soutient que les responsabilités éthiques dans les études sur les réfugiés se sont concentrées sur le terrain de recherche alors que l'éthique devrait également s’appliquer à la problématique de recherche - les objectifs, les questions et les concepts pouvant potentiellement causer préjudice. À partir d’un exemple issu de la Tanzanie, cet article soutient que les politiques publiques ont largement façonné le langage, les catégories étudiées ainsi que les cadres interprétatifs de la recherche sur les réfugiés, et préconise de porter une plus grande attention aux processus de racialisation historiques et contemporains qui sous-tendent les principes et pratiques humanitaires, ainsi qu’à la manière dont ils peuvent contribuer à l’exclusion et aux anxiétés ontologiques chez les réfugiés du Sud global. En élargissant la conceptualisation des responsabilités éthiques, les chercheurs sont mieux à même d’explorer la pertinence et les implications de l’approche qu’ils ont adoptée pour les communautés de réfugiés et dans quelle mesure ils renforcent ou remettent en question la racialisation et la déshumanisation des personnes cherchant refuge.

Weima, Y. (2021). Is it commerce?”: Dehumanization in the framing of “refugees as resources. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40796
 
Résumé
L’idée selon laquelle les réfugiés constituent des «ressources» a été prônée afin de contrer la déshumanisation qui s’opère lorsque les réfugiés sont dépeints comme des fardeaux ou comme une menace sécuritaire. Mais le cadrage des personnes comme ressources n’est-il pas en fait lui aussi déshumanisant? Les théoriciens des ressources ont souligné que les conceptions modernes occidentales de ce que constituent des ressources repose sur la distinction entre l’humain et le non-humain. Cette logique est similaire à la hiérarchisation racialisée de l’humanité et trouve son origine à la même époque. L’évaluation et la gestion du travail humain et de la mobilité par l’État continuent d’être façonnées par la «race» et par la perception de la valeur productive en termes économiques, tout comme la valeur accordée aux ressources varie et a toujours été sociale et politique. Cette intervention met en lumière la perspective d’un réfugié qui retrace la continuité entre des expériences d’animalisation et le fait d’être traité comme une ressource - en ce qu’une ressource peut être vendue ou échangée sans être consultée sur son avenir. Les réfugiés contribuent effectivement de manière significative aux communautés et aux pays où ils vivent, mais le prisme des «ressources» pose des limites à une perspective réellement humanisante sur la vie des réfugiés.
 
Abushama, H. (2021). Refugee Agency, Biopolitics and a New World. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40794
 
Résumé
Dans cette courte intervention, je discute de la formulation théorique de Giorgio Agamben sur la «vie nue», populaire dans les études sur les réfugiés. Cette formulation se rapporte spécifiquement au positionnement des réfugiés vis-à-vis des démocraties libérales occidentales et provient de l’analyse que fait Agamben (1988) du camp de concentration comme emblématique du fonctionnement de la souveraineté occidentale, comprise ici comme étant géographiquement et historiquement située. Dans une large mesure, les formulations d’Agamben émergent de sa tentative de se distancier de la théorie de Foucault sur le pouvoir comme étant décentralisé et spasmodique. En réfléchissant à travers les espaces des camps de réfugiés palestiniens, je cherche à démontrer les limites des discours sur la biopolitique et la vie nue en rendant compte des des relations de pouvoir aux multiples facettes qui produisent les camps de réfugiés palestinien. Les camps de réfugiés palestiniens ont été créés suite à la catastrophe palestinienne (Al Nakba) en 1948 et se sont répandus à travers de nombreux pays arabes. Ils sont constamment reproduits à travers des logiques de pouvoir imbriquées comprenant l’humanitarisme, les États arabes postcoloniaux et l’appareil colonial israélien. Je conclus en examinant certaines des formulations théoriques entourant les politiques du corps dans le champ des Black Studies, et particulièrement le concept de «chair» chez Alexander Weheliye (2014) afin d’explorer les nouvelles avenues qu’elles pourraient ouvrir dans les études sur les réfugiés.
 
Carpi, E. (2021). What Does a Humane Infrastructure for Research Look Like? Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40781
 
Résumé
Dans cette intervention, je fais deux suggestions principales pour humaniser la recherche sur les réfugiés. Premièrement, la tendance à choisir des «points chauds» comme terrains de recherche - où les chercheur.es approchent souvent les mêmes répondant.es dans les mêmes espaces - doit être non seulement dénoncée et évitée, mais aussi combattue. Deuxièmement, je suggère que la recherche sur les réfugiés devrait s’effectuer en collaboration avec d’autres champs d’études portant sur des phénomènes sociaux, politiques et économiques afin d’éviter de voir le déplacement comme la condition sine qua non de la recherche, mais plutôt comme l’une des nombreuses conditions que peut vivre une personne au sein des sociétés d’accueil. La poursuite de cet objectif sera plus facile si les études sur la migration forcée ne se compartimentent pas et ne se développent pas en vase clos par rapport aux autres disciplines et groupes de recherche.
 
Brankamp, H. (2021). Demarcating Boundaries: Against the “Humanitarian Embrace.” Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40791
 
Résumé
Dans les dernières années, des appels renouvelés en faveur du rapprochement entre le monde des décideurs politiques, des travailleurs humanitaires et des chercheurs en sciences humaines et sociales se sont fait entendre. Cela a conduit à une croissance des partenariats entre les universitaires, les organisations humanitaires, les gouvernements et les entreprises, qui ont uni leurs forces afin de venir en aide aux personnes dans le besoin. Cet article adresse une réponse critique à ces développements et remet en question la logique derrière ces tentatives de forger des partenariats de plus en plus étroits par-delà les frontières institutionnelles. Il soutient que le domaine humanitaire, malgré son hétérogénéité, n’est en aucun cas un terrain équitable où les significations, les structures de pouvoir et les pratiques d’aide humanitaire sont vraiment «ouvertes» à la négociation. Les tentatives de rapprochement ont souvent servi à consolider l’hégémonie institutionnelle et épistémique des acteurs humanitaires et a eu pour effet de délégitimer la recherche critique visant des changements structurels. Les chercheurs en études des réfugiés et de la migration forcée se retrouvent ainsi pris dans une «étreinte humanitaire» de plus en plus serrée. Cet article soutient qu’afin de remplir un engagement plus radical en faveur de la justice sociale, de la non-violence et de l’égalité, il est temps de délimiter les frontières entre l’humanitarisme institutionnalisé et la recherche politiquement engagée, lente et insurrectionnelle priorisant la solidarité avec les migrants marginalisés, racisés, mis en camps ou déplacés eux-mêmes. À cette fin, je propose l’infiltration, la recherche lente et l’accompagnement comme méthodologies de recherche alternatives dans les espaces humanitaires.
 
Darling, J. (2021). The cautious politics of “humanising” refugee research. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40798
 
Résumé
Dans cette intervention, je réfléchis à ce que pourrait signifier d’«humaniser» la recherche sur les réfugiés. On suppose souvent que l’«humanisation» peut  émerger à travers une attention à la particularité de l’individu, en puisant dans «la masse» le récit singulier et en utilisant ceci comme moyen de s’identifier, de compatir et potentiellement de comprendre les autres. Cependant, par un tel geste on court le risque de miser sur le recours à la création de relations d’empathie et de compassion qui passe outre à une réponse politique à la déshumanisation et qui repose sur une présomption universaliste de ce qui constitue la catégorie de «l’humain», présomption qui a été remise en question par les écrits postcoloniaux.
 
Bakewell, O. (2021). Humanising refugee research in a turbulent world. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40795
 
Résumé
Cet essai adopte une perspective critique à l’égard de l’idée d’humaniser la recherche sur les réfugiés. Il présente l’argument selon lequel une grande partie de la recherche en sciences sociales est intrinsèquement déshumanisante en ce qu’elle simplifie et réduit l’expérience humaine à des catégories et des modèles se prêtant à l’analyse. Les tentatives d’humaniser la recherche peuvent efficacement remettre en question et déstabiliser les structures hégémoniques puissantes et dominantes qui encadrent les politiques publiques et la recherche sur la migration forcée. Par contre, elle pourrait les remplacer par de nouveaux cadres de recherche, désormais imprégnés d’autorité comme représentant des expériences plus authentiques ou réelles. Plutôt que de revendiquer une position de supériorité morale en humanisant la recherche, une ambition plus restreinte et peut-être plus honnête serait de reconnaître que la déshumanisation est inévitable dans la recherche sur les réfugiés et de chercher à déshumaniser autrement.
 
Anderson, C. (2021) Humanizing Studies of Refuge and Displacement—Considering Complicity, Contingency, and Compromise. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40971
 
Bien que les contributions de cette section spéciale reconnaissent qu’elles incarnent «l’inhérente fragilité, l’incertitude et la polysémie» qui définissent leur quête, et bien que les interventions varient dans les «stratégies, alliances politiques et discours précis nécessaires à cette tâche» qu’elles proposent (Brankamp et Weima), elles contribuent, en tant que collection, à une conversation importante et continue sur le sens et le but de la recherche critique et sur le potentiel qu’elle recèle de refléter et d’améliorer les vies des réfugiés et autres populations en situation de migration forcée. Ce commentaire propose quelques réflexions sur la complicité, la contingence et le compromis. Suscitées par les interventions incluses ici, elles étendent et se rapportent à des discussions plus larges dans le domaine et au-delà, dans les sciences sociales, sur les mérites relatifs et les techniques pour promouvoir le changement et aspirer à un processus plus radical de transformation du monde.
 

La section générale

 
Yousuf, B. and Berry, N.S. (2021) The Resettlement Experiences of Oromo Women Who Entered Canada as Refugees. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40652
 
Résumé
Une littérature de plus en plus importante démontre que les expériences genrées produisent des conditions différentes pour les hommes et les femmes qui deviennent réfugié.es et également par la suite. Cet article contribue à cette littérature en enquêtant sur les difficultés rencontrées par les femmes Oromo qui ont immigré au Canada en tant que réfugiées. À cette fin, nous avons mené des entrevues auprès de six femmes Oromo dans l’Ouest du Canada au sujet de ce qui les a amenées à quitter l’Éthiopie, leurs expériences comme réfugiées demandant l’asile, et leurs difficultés en matière de réinstallation et d’intégration. Les résultats démontrent que les femmes Oromo partagent les difficultés rencontrées par leurs homologues masculins, mais sont aussi victimes de subjugation fondée sur le genre à chaque étape de l’émigration.
 
Richard, M. (2021). Soutenir sa famille en contexte de migration forcée en tant que femme syrienne établie au Québec et au Liban : entre vulnérabilités et responsabilités ambivalentes. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40765
 
Résumé:
Même si elle s’avère une pierre angulaire de l’accès à la protection, la vulnérabilité des femmes réfugiées fait rarement l’objet d’une définition allant au-delà de son sens commun - le risque de subir un préjudice. Cet article présente les résultats d’une recherche empirique où 8 récits de vie ont été recueillis auprès de femmes réfugiées syriennes responsables du soutien de leur famille au Liban (5) et au Québec (3). Une analyse mobilisant le concept de vulnérabilité ambivalente (Oliviero, 2016) a montré que les femmes et leurs proches se trouvent certes exposés à des formes d’adversité, mais également à des opportunités transformatrices et à des éléments de continuités de leurs trajectoires de vie.
 
Leanza, Y., Rocque, R., Brisset, C. and Gagnon, S. (2021). Training and Integrating Public Service Interpreters in a Refugee Health Clinic: A Mixed-Method Approach to Evaluate an Innovative Program. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40691
 
Résumé
Les barrières linguistiques peuvent avoir un impact négatif sur la santé des réfugiés et le recours à des interprètes qualifiés est un moyen de surmonter ces barrières en contexte de consultation médicale. Dans le cadre de cette étude, des interprètes ont été formés et intégrés à une clinique pour réfugiés. Des migrants de langue népalaise ont été recrutés et ont suivi cinquante heures de formation afin d’agir comme interprètes auprès de réfugiés bhoutanais récemment arrivés dans la ville de Québec. À des fins d’évaluation du projet, des données mixtes ont été recueillies. Lors de l’étude initiale et de l’étude de suivi, la santé des patient.es (telle que perçue par les praticien.nes) et leur satisfaction ont été évaluées. Les interprètes et les praticien.nes ont aussi pris part à des entretiens et des ateliers de discussion. La santé des patient.es est demeurée stable, mais, curieusement, les patient.es étaient légèrement moins satisfait.es lors de l’étude de suivi. Les praticien.nes et les interprètes ont décrit tant les bénéfices que les difficultés liés au programme. L’intégration des interprètes au sein de l’équipe clinique, par exemple, a permis une meilleure collaboration et une plus grande connaissance mutuelle des cultures. Les difficultés rencontrées incluent une surcharge de travail, des conflits entre les interprètes et les praticien.nes ainsi que des conflits de rôle pour les interprètes. De façon générale, l’intégration à temps plein d’interprètes qualifiés au sein de la clinique a facilité la communication et la gestion des cas. Cette pratique pourrait être particulièrement bénéfique pour une clientèle de réfugié.es. Dans les interventions futures, le rôle des interprètes devrait être mieux défini auprès des patient.es et des praticien.nes et une attention particulière devrait être portée aux critères de sélection des interprètes.
 
Arvisais, O., Charland, P., Audet, F. and Skelling-Desmeules, Y. (2021). Academic Persistence for Students Involved in the Accelerated Education Program in Dadaab Refugee Camp. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40737

Résumé
La communauté académique a souligné le manque de recherches sur les programmes d’éducation accélérée (PEA) dans les camps de réfugiés. En outre, les PEA prennent des formes différentes selon les pays. De façon générale, cependant, plusieurs PEA dans différentes parties du monde sont réputés pour leurs faibles taux de participation. Par conséquent, cet article présente les principaux obstacles causant l’absentéisme ou empêchant les étudiant.es de poursuivre leur éducation au sein du programme dans le camp de réfugiés de Dadaab. Notre étude démontre que l’action humanitaire elle-même joue un rôle important dans la persévérance scolaire des élèves. L’étude démontre également que les horaires flexibles ne sont pas une solution à l’absentéisme dans les PEA.
 
Huang, L.-S. (2021). “I Have Big, Big, Big Dream!”: Realigning Instruction with the Language-Learning Needs of Adult Syrians with Refugee Experience in Canada. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(2). https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40800

Résumé
Cet article rapporte les résultats d’une étude impliquant plusieurs sources de données qui cerne les besoins singuliers de réfugiés syriens adultes en matière d’apprentissage linguistique en développant et en mettant en œuvre des questionnaires d’évaluation des besoins; en réalisant des entrevues semi-structurées approfondies avec les apprenants et les enseignants; et en analysant la production orale des apprenants. Les renseignements obtenus à travers l’analyse de données directes (la production orale des apprenants) et de données indirectes (analyse de contenu des besoins rapportés par les apprenants et les enseignants à l’aide de NVivo 12 Plus) visent à guider le travail des chercheurs effectuant de l’analyse des besoins ainsi que les pratiques de manière applicable au-delà du contexte canadien, où les formateurs et développeurs de contenu travaillent avec des apprenants de l’anglais langue seconde qui sont réfugiés.
 

Recensions d’ouvrages

 
Refuge in a Moving World: Tracing Refugee and Migrant Journeys across Disciplines. Edited by Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh. London: UCL Press, 2020, pp. 529. Par Irene Tuzi. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40956
 
Post-Genocide Rwandan Refugees: Why They Refuse to Return ‘Home’: Myths and Realities. De Masako Yonekawa. Singapore: Springer, 2020, pp.136.  Par Naoko Hashimoto. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40952
 
Irregular Citizenship, Immigration, and Deportation. De Peter Nyers. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, pp. 172. Par Bahar Banaei. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40955
 
Border Jumping and Migration Control in Southern Africa de Francis Musoni, Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, pp. 218. Par René Bogović. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40949
 
Europe and the Refugee Crisis. De Frances Trix, London, UK: I.B. Tauris, 2018, pp. 266. Par Robert L. Larruina. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40950
 

Comptes-rendus de films

 
For Sama. Sous la direction de: Waad Al-Kateab, and Edward Watts. July 2019, 96 minutes. Par Serdar Kaya. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.40953
 

Notre prochain numéro (hiver 2021): section spéciale sur la COVID et début des célébrations du 40e anniversaire de Refuge - un aperçu


Notre prochain numéro (37.3), à paraître à l’hiver 2021, comportera une section spéciale sur l’impact de la pandémie de COVID-19 sur la migration forcée autour du globe. Il comportera des articles plus longs ainsi que de courtes réflexions. Il inclura également des réflexions et des messages de félicitations de certaines des anciennes équipes éditoriales de Refuge. Cette «couverture spéciale» se poursuivra dans notre numéro du printemps 2022.


Un nouveau «look» pour le 40e anniversaire de Refuge et prochaine mise à jour en termes d’accessibilité


Ce numéro affiche le nouveau «look» rafraîchi de Refuge. Nous espérons qu’il vous plaira! Afin de rendre hommage à sa longue histoire dans le champ et à son origine en tant qu’infolettre communautaire, la nouvelle configuration conserve l’emblématique disposition à deux colonnes. Pour signaler la position de Refuge parmi les autres revues révisées par les pairs dans le champ international et interdisciplinaire des études sur la migration forcée, la version pdf présente par ailleurs un aspect plus actuel et conforme aux normes de l’industrie.

Dans les coulisses, notre nouvelle plateforme de publication facilite la génération de métadonnées de haute qualité qui sont plus facilement indexées et liées aux principaux services d’indexation et de résumés, de Google Scholar à Scopus et autres, ce qui, nous l’espérons, conduira à un plus grand nombre de citations et de lecteurs.

Notre nouvelle plateforme nous permet aussi de publier les articles de Refuge dans d’autres formats, tels que html, epub et xml. Restez à l’affût car nous lancerons les articles de Refuge dans ces formats très prochainement!

La transition vers notre nouvelle configuration conduira aussi à une version plus accessible des articles de Refuge dans un avenir proche. Nous continuons à travailler avec nos vérificateurs en accessibilité afin de déterminer la meilleure marche à suivre et explorons les manières de baliser rétroactivement les versions pdf des articles archivés de Refuge.

 
Refuge rejoint HeinOnline et JSTOR


Pendant l’été, nous avons conclu des ententes avec deux importants fournisseurs américains de bases de données: HeinOnline, un fournisseur de contenu en services juridiques (qui inclut du contenu canadien et international) et JSTOR, une archive digitale axée sur les sciences humaines et sociales.

Les deux plateformes intégreront Refuge à leur contenu, permettant le téléchargement d’articles ainsi que la recherche en texte intégral. Bien sûr, l’accès au contenu de Refuge sur chacune de ces plateformes demeure en libre accès. Nous sommes ravis de nous joindre à leurs communautés.
 

Participation de Refuge à l’exposition virtuelle de l’IASFM18


Cet été, Refuge a eu l’honneur de participer à l’exposition virtuelle pour éditeurs universitaires de lInternational Association for the Study of Forced Migration (IASFM). Le thème de la conférence, organisée par l’Université du Ghana et ayant eu lieu virtuellement du 26 au 30 juillet, était Disrupting Theory, Unsettling Practice: Towards Transformative Forced Migration Scholarship. Notre séance virtuelle a été bien suivie et nous avons été très heureux de discuter de nos directives éditoriales et de notre processus avec les contributeurs actuels et potentiels de Refuge. Nous encourageons les participants à la conférence qui ont converti leurs présentations en articles, en particulier les auteurs du Sud global, à nous soumettre leurs travaux.


Tweet, tweet, tweety: Refuge a maintenant son propre identifiant Twitter!

 
Refuge a rejoint la communauté Twitter cet été avec son propre compte et son propre identifiant Twitter @RefugeJournal. Bien que nous continuions à bénéficier grandement de notre lien avec le Centre d’études sur les réfugiés de York en ce qui concerne toutes choses, dont les médias sociaux, ce sera formidable de rayonner un peu plus sur le #Twitterverse. Suivez-nous si vous êtes aussi sur Twitter!
 

Félicitations, départs et arrivées chez Refuge

 
Toutes nos félicitations à notre co-rédacteur, Pierre-André Thériault, pour avoir soutenu avec succès sa thèse de doctorat! Dr Thériault a depuis entamé un post-doctorat financé par le CRSH à la faculté de droit de l’Université de Toronto. Nous souhaitons chaleureusement la bienvenue à Fiona Harris, une étudiante au baccalauréat en santé globale à l’Université York, qui s’est jointe à l’équipe éditoriale de Refuge pendant l’été en tant que notre première étudiante travail-études et assistante éditoriale dévouée. Nous sommes chanceux de pouvoir la garder un peu plus longtemps alors qu’elle termine son (deuxième) baccalauréat! Nous remercions et disons au revoir à notre réviseur de longue date Ian McKenzie chez Paragraphics, qui prend sa retraite du travail avec Refuge. Félicitations et au revoir à Megan Bradley, l’une des membres de notre comité de rédaction, qui est entrée en fonction comme co-rédactrice pour le Journal for Refugee Studies (JRS) et qui quittera le comité de rédaction de Refuge.
 

Pourquoi le libre accès? En bref – partie 1 : histoire et croissance du mouvement pour le libre accès


Comprendre la publication en libre accès peut être déroutant. Pourquoi est-ce important? Et pourquoi s’en soucier? Voici une petite introduction aux origines du mouvement.

Le mouvement pour le libre accès a débuté lorsque les revues imprimées révisées par les pairs ont commencé à publier en ligne. Les éditeurs ont alors commencé à établir un système d’accès payant («paywall») semblable à celui déjà en place pour l’accès aux revues imprimées sous forme d’abonnement.

La création d’un système de «paywall» virtuel a exacerbé les inégalités dans l’accès aux ressources académiques de haute qualité pour les chercheurs du Sud global ou pour les personnes n’étant pas affiliées à une université. La Budapest Open Access Initiative (financée par la Open Society Foundation), lancée en 2002, invitait les chercheurs et les organisations à s’opposer aux inégalités créées par ce modèle de publication «fermé» à but lucratif (qui par ailleurs ne paie ni les pairs examinateurs, ni les auteurs, et qui, dans le cas de ces derniers, pose habituellement des limites à leur accès à leurs propres travaux en transférant les droits d’auteur aux maisons d’édition).

Depuis, le mouvement pour le libre accès a grandi et pris de l’ampleur. Plusieurs bailleurs de fonds (dont le Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines du Canada, la Commission européenne et le National Institute of Health aux É.-U.) exigent désormais que les recherches conduites avec l’aide de leurs fonds soient rendues disponibles en libre accès. Le Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) répertorie maintenant plus de 17 000 revues qui rencontrent ses indicateurs de qualité et qui publient en libre accès, dont Refuge.
 

Les articles de Refuge les plus consultés - 30 derniers jours

 
Muller, B. (2004). Globalization, Security, Paradox: Towards a Refugee Biopolitics. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 22(1), 49–57. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21317
 
Anderson, B., Sharma, N., & Wright, C. (2009). Editorial: Why No Borders? Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés 26(2), 5–18. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.32074
 
Pittaway, E. & Bartolomei, L. (2001.) Refugees, Race, and Gender: The Multiple Discrimination against Refugee Women. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 19(6), 21-32. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21236
 
Flood, L. U. (1997). Sardar Sarovar Dam: A Case Study of Development-induced Environmental Displacement. Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 16(3), 12–17. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21921
Read all Refuge articles at https://refuge.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/refuge
About the Journal
 
Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees is a non-profit, open access, peer-reviewed academic journal. It is bilingual and welcomes submissions in both English and French. It is interdisciplinary and publishes both theoretical and empirical work from a wide range of disciplinary and regional perspectives from academics, advanced graduate students, policy-makers, and practitioners in the field of forced migration. The journal provides space for discussion of emerging themes and debates. The journal also features a book review section and occasionally publishes special issues on specific themes related to forced migration. All works submitted to Refuge must be original and must not be submitted for consideration with other journals. Refuge does not publish personal reflections on forced migration experiences, fiction, artwork or poetry. Refuge articles are indexed and abstracted widely, from the DOAJ, Érudit, Google Scholar and Scopus (Elesvier) to PAIS International (ProQuest).
***
Refuge: Revue Canadienne sur les Réfugiés est une revue académique évaluée par les pairs à but non-lucratif et à libre accès. Refuge est une revue bilingue qui publie en français et en anglais. La revue est interdisciplinaire et publie des articles théoriques et empiriques provenant d’un large éventail de disciplines académiques et perspectives géographiques. Refuge publie des articles rédigés par des chercheurs actifs dans le milieu universitaire (professeurs et étudiants diplômés), par des responsables de l’élaboration des politiques, ainsi que par des individus qui œuvre sur le terrain dans le milieu de la migration forcée. Refuge offre un espace de discussion sur les enjeux et débats émergeants se rapportant aux réfugiés et à la migration forcée. La revue comprend également une section de comptes rendus de livres, et publie occasionnellement des numéros thématiques en lien avec la migration forcée. Toutes les soumissions à Refuge doivent être originales et ne pas faire l’objet d’une soumission à une autre revue. Refuge ne publie pas des réflexions personnelles, ni de fiction, d’ouvrages artistiques, ou de poésie. Les articles de Refuge sont indexés et résumés largement, du DOAJ, Érudit, Google Scholar et Scopus (Elesvier) au PAIS International (ProQuest).
 
Facebook
Twitter
Website
Email
Copyright © 2020, Centre for Refugee Studies, York University, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is / notre adresse postale est:
Refuge
Centre for Refugee Studies, York University
8th Floor, Kaneff Tower
4700 Keele Street
Toronto, ON  M3J 1P3

Want to change how you receive these emails? / Vous souhaitez modifier la façon dont vous recevez ces e-mails?
You can
update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list. / Vous pouvez mettre à jour vos préférences ou vous désinscrire de cette liste.
 






This email was sent to <<Email Address>>
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
Centre for Refugee Studies, York University · 852 Kaneff Tower, 4700 Keele Street · Toronto, On M3J1P3 · Canada

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp