Copy

Newsletter / Bulletin

December / Decembre 2020
Le français suit...

Table of Contents

Announcements

  1. Special issue (36.2), Refugee children, status and educational attainment: A comparative lens - out now!
  2. Featured articles and book reviews (36.2)
  3. Preview of our next (general) issue (37.1) coming in the spring of 2021
  4. Exciting changes coming to Refuge layout in 2021
  5. Refuge editor will participate in Global North/South roundtable with LERRN in 2021
  6. Most viewed Refuge articles - last 30 days
  7. Ongoing - Call for COVID papers and documentary film reviews
  8. End of year thank-yous 

Special issue (36.2), Refugee children, status and educational attainment: A comparative lens, guest editors: Maha Shuayb (Lebanese American University, Beirut) and Maurice Crul (VU University, Amsterdam) - out now!

  • Shuayb, M. and Crul, M. Beyond reification and emergency. Introduction - Special Issue. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 36(2).  DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40831.  


Abstract
 
Without a doubt, research on the education of refugee children and youth  has proliferated over the past 20 years, gaining even more momentum with the Syrian crisis from 2010 onwards. This special issue brings together contributions from the Global North and South to discuss the education of refugee children and youth. Although currently, approaches from the two spheres are still juxtaposed to each other in many ways. We hope that this special issue will encourage future collaborative and comparative research that can ask big questions across the global north and south and push for more inclusive human rights based thinking about refugees and education instead of continuing to perceive the issue of education of refugee children only as an emergency that merely requires a humanitarian and relief paradigm.
 

Featured articles and book reviews

 
Kelcey, J. & Chatila, S. (2020). Increasing Inclusion or Expanding Exclusion? How the Global Strategy to Include Refugees in National Education Systems Has Been Implemented in Lebanon. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 36(2). DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40713  

Abstract
UNHCR’s strategy to include refugee students in host state education systems is intended to promote refugees’ access to quality education. However, numbers of out-of-school refugees far exceed the global average. To understand why, we examine how Lebanese teachers and school principals understand and enact inclusion for school-age Syrian refugees. We find that inclusion has been pursued in ways that reproduce education inequities in Lebanon. Our findings underscore the importance of accounting for the internal complexities that shape the implementation and appropriation of policies within refugee host states and the ways in which these complexities interact with aid structures. 

Brun, C. & Shuayb, M. (2020). Exceptional And Futureless Humanitarian Education Of Syrian Refugees In Lebanon: Prospects For Shifting The Lens. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 36(2). DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40717  

Abstract
 
The article unpacks and analyses the potentials and shortcomings of a humanitarian framework for educational responses in protracted displacement. Humanitarianism is concerned with the immediate, while education is a future oriented activity. Calls to shift the humanitarian discourse from relief and survival to development have contributed to include education as part of the humanitarian response. The article analyses potentials and limitations in Lebanon’s education provision and policies for Syrian refugees. We discuss the impact and implications of the humanitarian response and reflect on what principles should be formulated for a socially just, inclusive, and more developmental education provision for refugees in protracted displacement.

Korntheuer, A. & Damm, A.-C. (2020). What Shapes the Integration Trajectory Of Refugee Students? A Comparative Policy Analysis In Two German States. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 36(2). DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40719
 
Abstract
 
Enabling the successful integration of refugee students into the German schooling system poses a crucial challenge for the coming years. Drawing from the human rights framework of the Inter-agency Network for Education in Emergencies standards, we applied a rights-based approach to policy analysis on educational provisions for refugee students from 2012 to 2018. According to international and European law, Germany is obliged to grant similar access to education for  its nationals as well as refugee children and youth. In reality, the realization of educational rights varies from state to state. This will be highlighted and discussed in this article, using the example of two very different German states, Hamburg and Saxony. The sudden rise of numbers of refugees led only slowly to an increase in educational policy density and intensity on federal state and national levels in 2016 and 2017. We find that the differences in compulsory schooling, models of integration into schooling, and the asylum and settlement policies in both states shape the educational participation of refugee children and youth. Both states implement parallel integration models that might bear risks of stigmatization and limit educational possibilities. However, transition and language support concepts in both contexts contain integrative phases offering language supports in the regular classrooms. Asylum policies and state-specific settlement policies have profound implications for the rights and the access to education. Further, VET programs play a crucial role, especially in Saxony, to tackle demographic challenges.

Homuth, C.,Welker, J.,  Will, G. & von Maurice, J. (2020). The Impact of Legal Status on Different Schooling Aspects of Adolescents in Germany, Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 36(2). DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40715
 
Abstract

During the so-called refugee crisis of 2015, approximately 300,000 underage asylum seekers came to Germany. We examine whether their legal status and their subjective perception of their status are equally important for their educational integration. On the basis of rational choice theory, we hypothesize how refugees’ legal status should affect their educational outcomes. Our study finds no differences among students with different legal statuses in school placement. However, students who perceive their status as insecure report significantly worse GPA than students who feel rather secure. Concerning the objective legal status, we do find that students with an insecure legal status report better grades than those with a granted refugee status. These contrary results show the importance of additionally considering the status perception in understanding and explaining educational outcomes of immigrants in further research. Educators should be aware of the potential divergence between objective and subjective status and their corresponding effects on educational trajectories.

Burke, R., Fleay, C., Baker, S., Hartley, L., & Field, R. (2020). Facilitating Access to Higher Education for People Seeking Asylum in Australia: Institutional and Community Responses. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 36(2). DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40658

Abstract
 
Higher education remains unattainable for many people seeking asylum in Australia, where temporary visa status renders individuals ineligible for a range of government services including assistance with financing tertiary study. Many universities have responded by offering scholarships and other essential supports; however, our research indicates the challenges associated with studying while living on a temporary visa can impact the success of educational assistance. Here, we highlight the importance of scholarships and other supports for facilitating access to tertiary study, particularly given the continuation of restrictive government policies, and identify the need for people seeking asylum to inform institutional and community responses.
 

Book Reviews in 36.2


Comparative Perspectives on Refugee Youth Education: Dreams and Realities in Educational Systems Worldwide. Edited By Alexander W. Wiseman, Lisa Damaschke-Deitrick, Ericka L. Galegher, Maureen F. Park. New York: Routledge, 2019, pp. 310. Reviewed by Isabel Krakoff. DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40837

Refugee Governance, State and Politics in the Middle East. By Zeynep Şahin Mencütek, Abingdon, UK: Routledge, 2019, pp. 266. Reviewed by Lama Mourad. DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40832

The Boy on the Beach: My Family’s Escape from Syria and Our Hope for a New Home. By Tima Kurdi, Toronto: Simon & Schuster Canada, 2018, pp. 241. Reviewed by Kyle Reissner and Gül Çalışkan. DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40834

Adventure Capital: Migration and the Making of an African Hub in Paris. By Julie Kleinman, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2019, pp. 209. Reviewed by Julia Morris. DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40835

Time, Migration and Forced Immobility: Sub-Saharan African Migrants in Morocco. By Inka Stock. Bristol: Bristol University Press. 2019, pp. 192. Reviewed by Natasha Saunders. Doi: 10.25071/1920-7336.40836

Refuge beyond Reach: How Rich Democracies Repel Asylum Seekers. By David Scott FitzGerald (2020) Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020. Reviewed by Kathryn Tomko Dennler. DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40833

Preview of next (general) issue (37.1) coming in the spring of 2021


Liew, J., Zambelli, P., Thériault, P-A. & Silcoff, M. (2021). Not Just the Luck of the Draw? Exploring Competency of Counsel and other Qualitative Factors in Federal Court Refugee Leave Determinations (2) Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(1).

Raska, J. (2021). “Small Gold Mine of Talent”: Integrating Prague Spring Refugee Professionals in Canada, 1968-1969. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(1).

van Kooy,J., Magee, L. & Robertson, S. (2021). ‘Boat people’ and discursive bordering: Australian parliamentary discourses on asylum seekers, 1977-2013. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(1).

Schmitt, C. (2021). ‘I want to give something back.’ Social Support and Reciprocity in Young Refugee’s Lives. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(1).

Shuyab, M. & Ahmad, N. (2021). The Psychosocial Condition of Syrian Children Amid a Precarious Future. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 37(1).

Exciting changes coming to Refuge in 2021


Refuge has been available as an open access, electronic publication through our website since 2013. All past, archived issues of Refuge (all the way back to our first issue from 1981!) can be accessed through our Archives page, equally in an open access format, free of charge. This ensures that the journal is accessible to readers who may not have access to academic libraries, including practitioners, people in situations of forced migration, and readers from the global south.
 
In 2021, we will be expanding our commitment to accessibility even further by publishing Refuge articles in a wider range of formats, including more accessible Word and HTML formats. We will also be ensuring that our PDFs comply with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0). In their words: “Following these guidelines will make content accessible to a wider range of people with disabilities, including blindness and low vision, deafness and hearing loss, learning disabilities, cognitive limitations, limited movement, speech disabilities, photosensitivity and combinations of these.”
 
Refuge’s website, as well as our submission and publication engine is powered by OJS (Open Journal Systems). Developed by PKP (Public Knowledge Project), it is “the most widely used open-source journal publishing platform in existence, with over 10,000 journals using it worldwide.” PKP already completed an accessibility audit in 2019 and is continuously working on making improvements to ensure accessibility of its themes.
 
As a result, our articles’ “look” (the layout) and our website will be slightly changing in 2021! Stay tuned for more updates.
 
 

Refuge editor will participate in Global North/South roundtable with LERRN in 2021


In the spring of 2019, Refuge participated in an initiative by The Local Engagement Refugee Research Network (LERRN) that was inspired by a self-reflection process initiated by the editors of the journal Migration Studies. In a blog post, the incoming editor-in-chief critically reflected on the geographic origins of their submission and publications. Given that most were from scholars in the Global North, he challenged the journal to be more inclusive in the future. LERRN took up the challenge and invited a number of forced migration journal editors to participate in a similar audit. The first results (a study of the Journal of Refugee Studies) were published in the LERRN newsletter in May 2020. More results, including for Refuge, will be coming soon and published in the LERRN newsletter. There will also be a webinar (or two) with forced migration journal editors, including Refuge’s! More details forthcoming in 2021.
 

Most viewed Refuge articles - last 30 days


Pittaway, E., & Bartolomei, L. (2001). Refugees, Race, and Gender: The Multiple Discrimination against Refugee Women. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 19(6), 21-32. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21236
 
Baker, J. (2013). Just Kids? Peer Racism in a Predominantly White City. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 29(1), 75-85. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.37508
 
Murray, S. (2010). Environmental Migrants and Canada’s Refugee Policy. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 27(1), 89-102. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.34351

Ongoing - Call for COVID papers and documentary film reviews

 

End of year “Thank-yous” 


2020 was a challenging year for all of us. We at Refuge (Dagmar, Kathryn, Chris, Pierre-André and Raluca) wanted to express our special gratitude to all of you who have served as our copy-editor (Ian), translator (Sabrina), authors and peer reviewers. Additional thanks go to our broader support team - Tomasz, York’s digital journals librarian, Jessica at Coalition Publi.ca, SSHRC, the members of CARFMS and last but not least, Sean and Michele at the Centre for Refugee Studies. To 2021 - it can only get better!
 

Table des matières

Annonces
  1. Numéro spécial (36.2), Refugee children, status and educational attainment: A comparative lens - maintenant disponible!
  2. Articles et comptes-rendus figurant dans le numéro (36.2) 
  3. Aperçu de notre prochain numéro général (37.1) à paraître au printemps 2021
  4. Changements excitants pour la mise en page de Refuge en 2021
  5. La rédactrice de Refuge participera à une table-ronde Nord/Sud avec le LERNN en 2021
  6. Les articles les plus consultés – 30 derniers jours
  7. En cours: appel à contributions – Le refuge en temps de pandémie et soumission de critiques de films documentaires
  8. Remerciements de fin d’année
 
Numéro spécial (36.2): Refugee children, status and educational attainment: A comparative lens rédacteurs invités: Maha Shuayb (Lebanese American University, Beirut) et Maurice Crul (VU University, Amsterdam) - maintenant disponible!
 
Shuayb, M. and Crul, M. Refugee Children: Beyond reification and emergency. Introduction - Special Issue. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 36(2).  DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40831.  

Résumé

Sans aucun doute, la recherche sur l’éducation des enfants et jeunes réfugiés a proliféré dans les vingt dernières années et s’est accélérée avec la crise syrienne depuis 2010. Ce numéro spécial rassemble des contributions du Nord et du Sud global afin de traiter de l’éducation des enfants et jeunes réfugiés. Actuellement, les approches dans les deux sphères sont de maintes façons juxtaposées l’une à l’autre. Nous espérons que ce numéro spécial stimulera de futures recherches collaboratives et comparatives. Celles-ci seraient en mesure de poser de grandes questions à travers le Nord et le Sud global et de promouvoir une pensée fondée sur les droits humains plus inclusive au sujet des réfugiés et de l’éducation plutôt que de continuer de percevoir la question de l’éducation des enfants réfugiés comme une urgence requérant un paradigme d’assistance humanitaire.
 

Articles et comptes-rendus figurant dans le numéro (36.2)


Kelcey, J. & Chatila, S. (2020). Increasing Inclusion or
Expanding Exclusion? How the Global Strategy to Include Refugees in National Education Systems Has Been Implemented in Lebanon. Refuge: revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 36(2). DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40713
 
Résumé
 
La stratégie du HCR d’inclure les étudiants réfugiés dans les systèmes d’éducation des pays hôtes est conçue afin de promouvoir l’accès à une éducation de qualité. Cependant, le nombre de réfugiés ne fréquentant pas l’école dépasse grandement la moyenne mondiale. Pour comprendre pourquoi, nous examinons comment les enseignants et directeurs d’écoles libanais comprennent et mettent en œuvre l’inclusion des réfugiés syriens d’âge scolaire. Nous constatons que la manière dont l’inclusion a été menée reproduit les iniquités existantes dans l’éducation au Liban. Nos résultats soulignent l’importance de rendre compte des complexités internes qui façonnent la mise en œuvre et l’appropriation des politiques dans les pays hôtes et de la manière dont ces complexités interagissent avec les structures d’aide.

Brun, C. & Shuayb, M. (2020). Exceptional And Futureless Humanitarian Education Of Syrian Refugees In Lebanon: Prospects For Shifting The Lens. Refuge: Refuge: revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 36(2). DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40717
 
Résumé
 
Cet article décortique et analyse les lacunes potentielles d’un cadre humanitaire pour les réponses éducatives au déplacement prolongé. L’humanitarisme se préoccupe de l’immédiat alors que l’éducation est une activité orientée vers l’avenir. Les appels à faire passer l’accent du discours humanitaire du secours et de la survie au développement ont contribué à l’inclusion de l’éducation dans l’intervention humanitaire. Cet article analyse le potentiel et les limites de l’offre et des politiques éducatives pour les réfugiés syriens au Liban. Nous discutons de l’effet et des ramifications de la réponse humanitaire et réfléchissons aux principes qui devraient être formulés pour une offre éducative socialement juste, inclusive et davantage axée sur le développement pour les réfugiés en situation de déplacement prolongé.

Korntheuer, A. & Damm, A.-C. (2020) What Shapes the Integration Trajectory Of Refugee Students? A Comparative Policy Analysis In Two German States. Refuge: Refuge: revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 36(2). DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40719  

Résumé
 
Favoriser des trajectoires d’intégration réussies pour les étudiants réfugiés dans le système d’éducation allemand constitue un défi important pour les prochaines années. Nous appuyant sur le cadre des droits humains du Réseau Inter-agences pour l’Éducation en Situations d’Urgence, nous avons appliqué une approche axée sur les droits à l’analyse des politiques en matière d’offre éducative pour les étudiants réfugiés de 2012 à 2018. En vertu de la loi nationale et européenne, l’Allemagne est dans l’obligation d’accorder aux enfants et aux jeunes réfugiés un accès à l’éducation comparable à celui de ses citoyens. Dans les faits, l’exercice du droit à l’éducation varie d’un État à l’autre. Cet article aborde cette question à travers les exemples de deux États allemands «très différents», soit Hambourg et la Saxe. La hausse soudaine du nombre de réfugiés n’a mené que très lentement à une densité et une intensité accrues des politiques éducatives au niveau des États fédéraux et au niveau national en 2016 et 2017. Nous constatons que les différences dans la scolarisation obligatoire, dans les modèles d’intégration au système scolaire et dans les politiques d’asile et d’établissement des deux États façonnent la participation éducative des enfants et des jeunes réfugiés. Les deux États mettent en œuvre des modèles d’intégration parallèles qui peuvent comporter des risques de stigmatisation et limiter les possibilités éducatives. Les approches en matière de transition et de soutien linguistique dans les deux contextes contiennent cependant des phases d’intégration où un soutien linguistique est offert dans les classes régulières. Les politiques d’asile et les politiques d’établissement propres à chaque État ont d’importantes conséquences en matière de droits et d’accès à l’éducation. De plus, les programmes de formation professionnelle jouent un rôle crucial, en particulier en Saxe, pour relever les défis démographiques.

Homuth, C.,Welker, J.,  Will, G. & von Maurice, J. (2020). The Impact of Legal Status on Different Schooling Aspects of Adolescents in Germany, Refuge: revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 36(2). DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40715
 
Résumé
 
Pendant la soi-disant «crise des réfugiés» de 2015, approximativement 300 000 demandeurs d’asile d’âge mineur sont arrivés en Allemagne. Nous examinons si leur statut légal et la perception subjective qu’ils ont de leur statut ont une importance égale en ce qui concerne leur intégration éducative. Nous appuyant sur la théorie du choix rationnel, nous émettons des hypothèses sur la manière dont le statut légal des réfugiés affecte leurs résultats scolaires. Notre étude ne révèle aucune divergence entre les étudiants de statuts légaux différents dans le placement scolaire. Cependant, les étudiants qui perçoivent leur statut comme précaire rapportent des moyennes significativement plus basses que ceux qui ont un plus grand sentiment de sécurité. En ce qui concerne le statut légal objectif, nous constatons que les étudiants au statut précaire rapportent de meilleures notes que ceux qui ont reçu le statut de réfugié. Ces résultats contradictoires montrent qu’il est important de tenir compte de la manière dont les immigrants perçoivent leur statut afin de comprendre et d’expliquer leurs résultats scolaires lors de recherches ultérieures. Les éducateurs devraient être conscients des potentielles divergences entre le statut objectif et le statut subjectif ainsi que leurs effets sur les trajectoires éducatives.

Burke, R., Fleay, C., Baker, S., Hartley, L., & Field, R. (2020). Facilitating Access to Higher Education for People Seeking Asylum in Australia: Institutional and Community Responses. Refuge: revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 36(2). DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40658

Résumé
 
L’éducation supérieure demeure inatteignable pour plusieurs personnes demandant l’asile en Australie, où le statut rattaché au visa temporaire rend les individus inéligibles à une gamme de services, dont l’aide financière aux études postsecondaires. Plusieurs universités ont réagi en offrant des bourses et autres soutiens essentiels. Cependant, notre recherche indique que les obstacles liés au fait d’étudier tout en vivant avec un visa temporaire peuvent affecter le succès de l’aide aux études. Nous soulignons l’importance des bourses et d’autres types de soutien pour promouvoir l’accès aux études postsecondaires, particulièrement dans le contexte de politiques gouvernementales restrictives, et identifions la nécessité pour les personnes demandeuses d’asile de contribuer aux réponses institutionnelles et communautaires.


Critiques des livres en 36.2


Comparative Perspectives on Refugee Youth Education: Dreams and Realities in Educational Systems Worldwide. Edited By Alexander W. Wiseman, Lisa Damaschke-Deitrick, Ericka L. Galegher, Maureen F. Park. New York: Routledge, 2019, pp. 310. Reviewed by Isabel Krakoff. DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40837
 
Refugee Governance, State and Politics in the Middle East. By Zeynep Şahin Mencütek, Abingdon, UK: Routledge, 2019, pp. 266. Reviewed by Lama Mourad. DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40832

The Boy on the Beach: My Family’s Escape from Syria and Our Hope for a New Home. By Tima Kurdi, Toronto: Simon & Schuster Canada, 2018, pp. 241. Reviewed by Kyle Reissner and Gül Çalışkan. DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40834
 
Adventure Capital: Migration and the Making of an African Hub in Paris. By Julie Kleinman, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2019, pp. 209. Reviewed by Julia Morris. DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40835
 
Time, Migration and Forced Immobility: Sub-Saharan African Migrants in Morocco. By Inka Stock. Bristol: Bristol University Press. 2019, pp. 192. Reviewed by Natasha Saunders. Doi: 10.25071/1920-7336.40836
 
Refuge beyond Reach: How Rich Democracies Repel Asylum Seekers. By David Scott FitzGerald (2020) Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020. Reviewed by Kathryn Tomko Dennler. DOI: 10.25071/1920-7336.40833
 

Aperçu du prochain numéro général (37.1) à paraître au printemps 2021

 
Liew, J., Zambelli, P., Thériault, P-A. & Silcoff, M. Not Just the Luck of the Draw? Exploring Competency of Counsel and other Qualitative Factors in Federal Court Refugee Leave Determinations (2005-2010). Refuge: revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(1).
 
Raska, J. “Small Gold Mine of Talent”: Integrating Prague Spring Refugee Professionals in Canada, 1968-1969. Refuge: revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(1).
 
van Kooy,J., Magee, L. & Robertson, S. ‘Boat people’ and discursive bordering: Australian parliamentary discourses on asylum seekers, 1977-2013. Refuge: revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(1).
 
Schmitt, C. ‘I want to give something back.’ Social Support and Reciprocity in Young Refugee’s Lives. Refuge: revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(1).
 
Shuyab, M. & Ahmad, N. The Psychosocial Condition of Syrian Children Amid a Precarious Future. Refuge: revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 37(1).
 

Changements excitants pour Refuge en 2021

 
Refuge est disponible comme publication électronique en libre-accès sur notre site web depuis 2013. Tous les numéros archivés précédents (remontant jusqu'à notre tout premier numéro de 1981!) sont également disponibles gratuitement en libre-accès à travers notre page d'Archives. La revue est ainsi accessible aux lecteurs et lectrices n'ayant pas accès aux bibliothèques universitaires, comme les praticiens et praticiennes, les personnes en situation de migration forcée et les lecteurs et lectrices du Sud global.
 
En 2021, nous approfondirons notre engagement envers l'accessibilité en publiant les articles de Refuge dans un plus grand éventail de formats, y compris des formats Word et HTML plus accessibles. Nous nous assurerons également que nos fichiers PDF se conforment aux Règles pour l'accessibilité des contenus Web (WCAG 2.0). Dans leurs mots: «Suivre ces règles rendra les contenus accessibles à une plus grande variété de personnes en situation de handicap, incluant les personnes aveugles et malvoyantes, les personnes sourdes et malentendantes, les personnes ayant des troubles d'apprentissage, des limitations cognitives, des limitations motrices, des limitations de la parole, de la photosensibilité et les personnes ayant une combinaison de ces limitations fonctionnelles.»
 
Le site web de Refuge ainsi que notre système de soumission et de publication sont alimentés par OJS (Open Journal Systems). Développé par PKP (Public Knowledge Project), il s'agit de «la plus grande plateforme existante en open source pour la publication de revues, utilisée par plus de 10 000 revues à travers le monde» (traduction libre). PKP a déjà complété une vérification d'accessibilité en 2019 et travaille continuellement à améliorer l'accessibilité de ses thèmes.
 
Conséquemment, le «look» de nos articles et la configuration de notre site web vont légèrement changer en 2021. Restez à l'affût des mises à jour!
 

La rédactrice de Refuge participera à une table-ronde Nord/Sud avec le LERRN en 2021


Au printemps 2019, Refuge a participé à une initiative du Local Engagement Refugee Research Network (LERRN), inspirée par un processus de réflexion interne initié par les rédacteurs de la revue Migration Studies. Dans un article de blog, le rédacteur en chef entrant a réfléchi de manière critique aux origines géographiques des soumissions qu'ils reçoivent et de leurs publications. Étant donné que la plupart provenaient du Nord global, il a appelé la revue à faire preuve d'une plus grande inclusivité à l'avenir. Le LERRN a emboîté le pas et a invité plusieurs rédacteurs et rédactrices de revues sur la migration forcée à participer à un exercice similaire. Les premiers résultats (une étude portant sur le Journal of Refugee Studies) a été publiée dans la newsletter du LERRN en mai 2020. Davantage de résultats, y compris pour Refuge, seront bientôt publiés dans la newsletter du LERRN. Un webinaire sera également organisé avec les rédacteurs et rédactrices de revues sur la migration forcée, dont celle de Refuge! Plus de détails à venir en 2021.
 

Les articles les plus consultés – 30 derniers jours

 
Pittaway, E., & Bartolomei, L. (2001). Refugees, Race, and Gender: The Multiple Discrimination against Refugee Women. Refuge: revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 19(6), 21-32. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.21236
 
Baker, J. (2013). Just Kids? Peer Racism in a Predominantly White City. Refuge: revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 29(1), 75-85. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.37508
 
Murray, S. (2010). Environmental Migrants and Canada’s Refugee Policy. Refuge: revue canadienne sur les réfugiés, 27(1), 89-102. https://doi.org/10.25071/1920-7336.34351

 

En cours: appel à contributions – Le refuge en temps de pandémie

 

Remerciements de fin d’année

 
2020 a été une année difficile pour tout le monde. L’équipe de Refuge (Dagmar, Kathryn, Chris, Pierre-André et Raluca) souhaitent exprimer leur profonde reconnaissance envers tous ceux et celles qui ont servi comme réviseur (Ian), traductrice (Sabrina), auteurs et pairs examinateurs. Des remerciements supplémentaires sont adressés à notre équipe de soutien plus large: Tomasz, le bibliothécaire aux revues numériques à York, Jessica chez Coalition Publi.ca, le CRSH, les membres du CARFMS et, les derniers mais non les moindres, Sean et Michele au Centre d’études sur les réfugiés. À 2021 - les choses ne peuvent que s’améliorer!
Read all Refuge papers at https://refuge.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/refuge
About the Journal
 
Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees is a non-profit, open access, peer-reviewed academic journal. It is bilingual and welcomes submissions in both English and French. It is interdisciplinary and publishes both theoretical and empirical work from a wide range of disciplinary and regional perspectives from academics, advanced graduate students, policy-makers, and practitioners in the field of forced migration. The journal provides space for discussion of emerging themes and debates. The journal also features a book review section and occasionally publishes special issues on specific themes related to forced migration. All works submitted to Refuge must be original and must not be submitted for consideration with other journals. Refuge does not publish personal reflections on forced migration experiences, fiction, artwork or poetry. Refuge articles are indexed and abstracted widely, from the DOAJ, Érudit, Google Scholar and Scopus (Elesvier) to PAIS International (ProQuest).
***
Refuge: Revue Canadienne sur les Réfugiés est une revue académique évaluée par les pairs à but non-lucratif et à libre accès. Refuge est une revue bilingue qui publie en français et en anglais. La revue est interdisciplinaire et publie des articles théoriques et empiriques provenant d’un large éventail de disciplines académiques et perspectives géographiques. Refuge publie des articles rédigés par des chercheurs actifs dans le milieu universitaire (professeurs et étudiants diplômés), par des responsables de l’élaboration des politiques, ainsi que par des individus qui œuvre sur le terrain dans le milieu de la migration forcée. Refuge offre un espace de discussion sur les enjeux et débats émergeants se rapportant aux réfugiés et à la migration forcée. La revue comprend également une section de comptes rendus de livres, et publie occasionnellement des numéros thématiques en lien avec la migration forcée. Toutes les soumissions à Refuge doivent être originales et ne pas faire l’objet d’une soumission à une autre revue. Refuge ne publie pas des réflexions personnelles, ni de fiction, d’ouvrages artistiques, ou de poésie. Les articles de Refuge sont indexés et résumés largement, du DOAJ, Érudit, Google Scholar et Scopus (Elesvier) au PAIS International (ProQuest).
 
Facebook
Twitter
Website
Email
Copyright © 2020, Centre for Refugee Studies, York University, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is / notre adresse postale est:
Refuge
Centre for Refugee Studies, York University
8th Floor, Kaneff Tower
4700 Keele Street
Toronto, ON  M3J 1P3

Want to change how you receive these emails? / Vous souhaitez modifier la façon dont vous recevez ces e-mails?
You can
update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list. / Vous pouvez mettre à jour vos préférences ou vous désinscrire de cette liste.
 






This email was sent to <<Email Address>>
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
Centre for Refugee Studies, York University · 852 Kaneff Tower, 4700 Keele Street · Toronto, On M3J1P3 · Canada

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp