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The Weekest Link #1
Hi friends,

First off, thank you so much for checking out The Weekest Link.

The #1 goal of this newsletter is information sharing. I hope that by circulating thoughtful reads we are each able to foster personal growth and gain new perspectives. Most of the time the content will be links & quotes to reads from the past week that I found memorable, although other content may be included.

Most of the links you'll find here will be focused on technology, mental health, or generally well-written pieces. I will do my best to not include works of heavy partisanship out of respect to all of our various viewpoints and opinions. I will also do my best to only link free content, and will make note otherwise.

With that said, here's the first edition of TWL! I hope you enjoy with a beverage of your choice.

Love ❤,
Nick Rizk

PS: I will be playing around with the formatting of this newsletter. If you have feedback that makes it easier to read, please share!
5 Links

1. What We Should Have Learned in School But Never Did​

 

Quote:

“When you approve of yourself you will also attract people who approve of you. When you have a low opinion of yourself you will inevitably attract people who agree with that low opinion.”

Quote:

“There are few things more liberating in life than giving up the need to be liked by everyone. Not only is this impossible and out of your control. It’s exhausting."

Quote:

"Once you give this up, two things happen:
1. You stop wasting a tremendous amount of time and energy
2. The depth and quality of the relationships you do have with people in your life increases dramatically.”

2. Laziness Does Not Exist

 

Quote:

“When you’re seeking to predict or explain a person’s actions, looking at the social norms, and the person’s context, is usually a pretty safe bet. Situational constraints typically predict behavior far better than personality, intelligence, or other individual-level traits."

Quote:

“If a person’s behavior doesn’t make sense to you, it is because you are missing a part of their context. It’s that simple."

Quote:

"People do not choose to fail or disappoint. No one wants to feel incapable, apathetic, or ineffective. If you look at a person’s action (or inaction) and see only laziness, you are missing key details. There is always an explanation. There are always barriers. Just because you can’t see them, or don’t view them as legitimate, doesn’t mean they’re not there."

3. A Neuroscientist explains what tech does to the brain


Disclosure:  reading only the quotes for this link is sufficient enough.
I enjoyed the first couple of paragraphs.

Quote:

“When we have any function, whether it’s language or vision or cognitive functions like memory, we aren’t dealing with a straight line to the brain that says “This is what I do.” The brain builds a network of connections, a network of neurons that have a particular role in that function. So when we have a new cognitive function, like literacy, it doesn’t have a preset network. Rather, it makes new connections among older networks, and that whole collection of networks becomes a circuit. It’s a connected scaffolding of parts."

Quote:

“The beauty of the circuit for functions like literacy is its plasticity. You can have one for each different language, like English or Chinese or Hebrew. And then something miraculous happens: the circuit builds upon itself. The first circuits are very basic — for decoding letters as we’re learning to read — but everything we read builds upon itself.

4. Data Factories


Quote:

“...regulators need to understand that the power of Aggregators comes from controlling demand, not supply. Specifically, consumers voluntarily use Google and Facebook, and “suppliers” like content providers, advertisers, and users themselves, have no choice but to go where consumers are."

Quote:

“Facebook’s ultimate threat can never come from publishers or advertisers, but rather demand — that is, users. The real danger, though, is not from users also using competing social networks (although Facebook has always been paranoid about exactly that); that is not enough to break the virtuous cycle. Rather, the only thing that could undo Facebook’s power is users actively rejecting the app. And, I suspect, the only way users would do that en masse would be if it became accepted fact that Facebook is actively bad for you — the online equivalent of smoking."

5. Co-living firms, like Common & Ollie, are a booming trend


Note: this is a paid article, but there is a workaround:
Step 1 - Copy this text: For Rent: 98-Square-Foot BR in Co-Living Apt., Community Included
Step 2 - paste that into google
Step 3 - Click on the WSJ article

Quote:

“People have divvied up urban living quarters since at least the days of ancient Rome. A corner of that market is now app-powered and designed to appeal to those accustomed to ride-hailing, same-day delivery and made-for-Instagram experiences."

Quote:

“Part of what’s driving the co-living movement is that developers make more money a square foot, even as they charge customers less in total monthly rent than they would pay for a studio or even, in some cases, a comparable roommate situation. That flat price—which also includes timesaving services and a social element—gives residents the perception of a better deal."

Quote:

“Even if they succeed, co-living startups are unlikely to solve America’s affordable-housing crisis. To address the “vast” gap between housing demand and supply, New York City is spending $8.2 billion, and Sen. Elizabeth Warren proposed the American Housing and Economic Mobility Act, which includes $477 billion in federal spending."
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