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Celebrating
the Life of
Henry Horwitz
by Jeff Cox
      Henry Horwitz died on January 19, 2019, leaving to mourn him family, friends, former students, and former colleagues, especially those in the University of Iowa history department. Henry joined the department in 1963, with degrees from Haverford College (1959 summa cum laude) and Oxford University (D. Phil., 1963). At St. Antony’s College, Oxford, he developed an interest in early modern English political history, leading to the publication of Revolution Politicks: The Career of Daniel Finch, Second Earl of Nottingham 1647-1730 (Cambridge U.P., 1968); Parliament, Policy and Politics in the Reign of William III (Manchester U.P., 1977); and an edition, The Parliamentary Diary of Narcissus Luttrell 1691-1693 (Oxford U.P., Clarendon Press, 1972).
      In 1982, Henry received a law degree from the University of Iowa College of Law.  After practicing law in New York City for two years, he returned to Iowa to follow his interests in legal history.  He received grants from the Leverhulme Trust (UK) and the National Endowment for the Humanities to produce an annotated guide to the records of the Court of Chancery.  His two publications, Chancery Equity Records and Proceedings 1600-1800 (Public Record Office Handbook 27, 1995), and Exchequer Equity Records and Proceedings 1649-1841 (Public Record Office Handbook 32, 2001), are regarded as his greatest contributions to scholarship.
      Colleagues recall that Henry made it his mission to create an egalitarian and collegial department that maintained high standards of scholarship during a time of significant changes in higher education. Henry provided strong leadership in making the department a welcoming place for new colleagues who had just survived the department’s distinctively daunting hiring procedures. This collegiality extended to department meetings, sometimes lengthy, in which he set the tone that everyone’s opinion was to be treated with respect. Henry also was noted for his striking personal generosity to students and colleagues, and to the broader community.
      Henry was instrumental in developing a new General Education model for non-majors, in which graduate students offer small sections of “Issues in Human History” as an alternative to the large lecture course format. Each year the department awards the Henry Horwitz Prize for the best “Issues” syllabus created by a graduate student. Although he retired from the department in 2004, Henry’s legacy lives on.
     Henry will be missed by those who survive him:  his wife Juliet Gardiner, his daughter Elizabeth Russell, his brother Tem Horwitz, his stepson Simon Cope, and former students and colleagues.
In the Media
Historians Talking History
Assistant Professor Simon Balto was recently interviewed in a Chicago Tribune story about the 1919 race riot there and the commemorations about it.  To read the full story click here.
Current undergraduate student, Nicholas Dolan, was published recently in the Little Village Magazine. Nicholas is an honors student working towards a BA in both History and English Literature.  Read his full article "‘Bright Radical Star’: When John Brown came to Iowa"
Publications
Extra, Extra, Read All About It!  For a complete list of all past publications from History Faculty, Alumni and current Students see our Research web page.

Michael E. Moore, "Epilogue: Ernst Cassirer and Renaissance Cultural Studies: The Figure of Nicholas of Cusa." In: Nicholas of Cusa and the Making of the Early Modern World, edited by Simon J.G. Burton, Joshua Hollman, and Eric M. Parker (Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2019), pp. 485-506.

Aihua Zheng, "Zen, ethnic Japanese interacting with elite white Americans.” In: Race and Ethnicity in the United States: From Pre-contact to the Present, edited by Russell M. Lawson and Benjamin A. Lawson, (Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, Inc., ABC-CLIO/Greenwood), Oct 2019

Aihua Zheng,  “Pure Land Buddhism, and Japanese and Chinese Americans.” In: Race and Ethnicity in the United States: From Pre-contact to the Present, edited by Russell M. Lawson and Benjamin A. Lawson, (Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, Inc., ABC-CLIO/Greenwood), Oct 2019

Aihua Zheng, “World War II Propaganda and Japanese Americans.” In: Race and Ethnicity in the United States: From Pre-contact to the Present, edited by Russell M. Lawson and Benjamin A. Lawson, (Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, Inc., ABC-CLIO/Greenwood), Oct 2019

Aihua Zheng, “Asian Americans.” In: Race and Ethnicity in the United States: From Pre-contact to the Present, edited by Russell M. Lawson and Benjamin A. Lawson, (Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, Inc., ABC-CLIO/Greenwood), Oct 2019

What's Happening!?
Our historians are doing wonderful things.  For a complete list of History Dept and history-related events, click here to view the Calendar
     Across the world, on Jan 27, 2019, theaters, churches, mosques, synagogues, universities, museums and others will screen Who Will Write Our History. Learn more about the initiative here.
     The film will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by Rabbi Esther Hugenholtz with History's own Professor Lisa Heineman, and Susan Simon, daughter of Holocaust survivors.
     The UI History Department has planned a fascinating Rapid Response History series for the Spring 2019 semester, this time on #MeToo: Historical Perspectives on Gender and Violence.
     The lecture/discussions are open to students for credit and to the rest of us as part of the department's public educational mission, Tuesdays beginning March 12 from 5-7pm in 140 Schaeffer Hall.
Send Us Your Exciting News, Publications and Other Updates!
Record low temperatures in the forecast for Iowa City this weekend and into next week ... stay safe and stay warm out there!
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