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Caravan condemns residential school legacy, honors Indigenous resistance


Caravan condemns residential school legacy, honors Indigenous resistance

On‌ ‌July‌ ‌18, ‌between‌ ‌50-60‌ ‌cars‌ ‌gathered‌ ‌at‌ ‌the‌ ‌historical‌ ‌Sherman‌ ‌Indian‌ ‌School‌ ‌in‌ ‌Riverside,‌ Calif., ‌for‌ ‌a‌ ‌caravan‌ ‌to‌ ‌honor‌ ‌“Indian‌ ‌resilience”‌ ‌in‌ ‌the‌ ‌face‌ ‌of‌ ‌brutal‌ ‌European‌ ‌colonialism.‌ ‌The‌ ‌event also honored “lost‌ ‌children,”‌ ‌a‌ ‌reference‌ ‌to‌ ‌the‌ ‌many‌ ‌Indigenous‌ youth ‌who‌ ‌perished‌ ‌while‌ ‌attending‌ ‌the‌ ‌boarding‌ ‌school.‌  ‌

The‌ ‌gathering‌ ‌was‌ ‌called‌ ‌in‌ ‌response‌ ‌to‌ ‌news‌ ‌out‌ ‌of‌ ‌Canada‌ ‌that‌ ‌the‌ ‌remains‌ ‌of‌ ‌215‌ ‌children‌ ‌were‌ ‌found‌ ‌in‌ ‌a‌ ‌mass‌ ‌grave‌ ‌on‌ ‌the‌ ‌grounds‌ ‌of‌  ‌the‌ ‌former‌ ‌Kamloops‌ ‌Indian‌ ‌Residential‌ ‌School‌ ‌in‌ ‌British‌ ‌Columbia.‌ ‌

Beginning‌ ‌in‌ ‌the‌ ‌mid-19th ‌century,‌ ‌European‌ ‌colonizers‌ ‌to‌ ‌the‌ ‌Americas began‌ ‌forcing‌ ‌young Native people ‌out‌ ‌of‌ ‌their‌ ‌reservation‌ ‌homes‌ ‌and‌ ‌into‌ ‌off-reservation‌ ‌boarding‌ ‌schools‌, ‌with‌ ‌the‌ ‌express‌ ‌purpose‌ ‌of‌ ‌assimilation‌ ‌into‌ ‌European‌ ‌culture‌ and training ‌for‌ ‌menial‌ ‌labor.‌ ‌ ‌

Caravaners‌ ‌dressed‌ ‌in‌ ‌bright‌ ‌orange‌ ‌and‌ ‌their‌ ‌cars‌ ‌were‌ ‌decorated‌ with ‌bright‌ ‌orange‌ ‌flags‌ ‌and‌ ‌signs‌ ‌that‌ ‌read‌ ‌“Honor‌ ‌the‌ ‌children”‌ ‌and‌ ‌“Honor‌ ‌the‌ ‌survivors.” ‌The‌ ‌route‌ ‌proceeded‌ ‌from‌ ‌the‌ ‌campus‌ ‌to‌ ‌the‌ ‌Sherman‌ ‌Indian‌ ‌School‌ ‌Cemetery‌ ‌five-and-a-half miles away‌, ‌where‌ ‌the‌ ‌remains‌ ‌of‌ ‌67‌ ‌Native‌ ‌children‌ ‌reside.‌ ‌

It‌ ‌has‌ ‌been‌ ‌reported‌ ‌that‌ ‌the‌ ‌causes‌ ‌of‌ ‌death‌ ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌children‌ ‌were‌ ‌from‌ ‌disease‌ ‌(typhoid‌ ‌ravaged‌ ‌the‌ ‌school‌ ‌in‌ ‌1904),‌ ‌“accidents”‌ ‌and‌ ‌bad‌ ‌water.‌  Ten‌ ‌children‌ ‌were‌ ‌reported‌ ‌to‌ ‌have‌ ‌died‌ ‌from‌ ‌typhoid,‌ ‌including‌ ‌three ‌siblings‌ ‌and‌ ‌a‌ ‌1‌-year‌-‌old‌ ‌baby‌ ‌girl.‌ ‌The‌ ‌average‌ ‌age‌ ‌of‌ youth ‌who‌ ‌attended‌ ‌Sherman‌ ‌were‌ ‌from‌ ‌4‌ ‌years‌ ‌old‌ ‌into‌ ‌their‌ twenties.‌ ‌ ‌

‌The‌ ‌Sherman‌ ‌Indian‌ ‌School‌, also‌ ‌known‌ ‌as‌ ‌the‌ ‌Sherman‌ ‌Institute,‌ was ‌founded‌ ‌by‌ ‌Frank‌ ‌Miller‌ ‌and‌ ‌named‌ ‌after‌ James‌ ‌S.‌ ‌Sherman‌, U.S.

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Haiti and Cuba—two great revolutions


Haiti and Cuba—two great revolutions

The Haitian and Cuban revolutions are two of the greatest events in world history. Both social upheavals inspired oppressed peoples and terrified their oppressors.

The Haitian Revolution was the only successful slave revolution in history. Every slave master from Texas to Maryland feared enslaved Africans rising up and breaking their chains, like they did in Haiti.

Continue reading Haiti and Cuba—two great revolutions at Struggle - La Lucha.


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