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Filling the Gap Educational Consultants, LLC presents The REWire; The REWire is a monthly email newsletter dedicated to curating Race + Education news, views and research

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Early Benchmarks Show ‘Post-Millennials’ on Track to Be Most Diverse, Best-Educated Generation Yet

Pew Research Center

As a new generation of Americans begins to take shape and move toward adulthood, there is mounting interest in their attitudes, behaviors and lifestyle. But how will this generation change the demographic fabric of the United States? A new Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau data finds that the “post-Millennial” generation is already the most racially and ethnically diverse generation, as a bare majority of 6- to 21-year-olds (52%) are non-Hispanic whites. And while most are still pursuing their K-12 education, the oldest post-Millennials are enrolling in college at a significantly higher rate than Millennials were at a comparable age.

News

Minority children with a strong sense of ethnic-racial identity are more resilient to harms of discrimination, study finds

MinnPost

Children as young as 7 years old are able to detect racial and ethnic discrimination aimed at them, according to a recent study. But children who are raised with a strong sense of their ethnic-racial identity are more resilient to the psychological harm that such discrimination inflicts, the study also found. “These findings highlight the importance of reducing discrimination and its pernicious effects, as well as promoting a positive sense of ethnic-racial identity and belonging to partially buffer children in the interim,” said Tuppett Yates, one of the study’s authors and a developmental psychologist at the University of California, Riverside, in a released statement.

Making a Statement on Diversity Statements

Inside Higher Ed

The debate over required faculty candidate statements on diversity and inclusion heated up again over the weekend, after the former dean of Harvard University’s medical school shared his pointed criticism on social media. "As a dean of a major academic institution, I could not have said this. But I will now,” Jeffrey Flier, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Higginson Professor of Physiology and Medicine, tweeted Saturday. “Requiring such statements in applications for appointments and promotions is an affront to academic freedom, and diminishes the true value of diversity, equity of inclusion by trivializing it."

School Must Pay $68k to Black Girl Who Had Rope Tied Around Her Neck

Ebony Magazine

A Texas private school was ordered by a jury to pay $68,000 in damages to a Black girl’s family after she was discovered with rope burns around her neck following a school trip, The New York Times reports. The girl’s family sued Waco, Texas’ Live Oak Classical School in 2016 after the then sixth-grader said that three White classmates placed a rope over her neck and dragged her to the ground. The school insisted that it was an accident, but the family’s lawyer argued that the girl’s injury was because of bullying and requested $5.3 million in damages, per the Times

USC Race and Equity Center Unveils PRISM

Diverse Issues

A new racial equity tech tool from the Race and Equity Center at the University of Southern California (USC) will change the face of higher education and provide a platform for academic professionals of color to engage with potential employers and cultivate community. Unveiled at USC’s campus this week, PRISM will go live on December 5, allowing people of color who are faculty, administrators and career-switching professionals to create profiles, search for jobs, form or join virtual groups and access professional learning sessions and resources.

Missouri Teacher Suspended After ‘Lapse In Judgment’ for Allowing Student to Dress as Klansman

Atlanta Black Star

A southern Missouri teacher who oversaw a history class presentation in which a ninth-grader dressed as a member of the Ku Klux Klan has apologized for a “lapse of judgment” and is suspended indefinitely, the superintendent of the predominantly white district said Tuesday. The Poplar Bluff student who dressed as a Klansman Friday was playing the villain in a skit about voter suppression during a presentation with other students about the 15th Amendment, Poplar Bluff district superintendent Scott Dill said. The amendment awarded voting rights to black men. Other groups in the class were assigned other amendments. Dill said the teacher didn’t know until right before the group performed that the student planned to dress as a Klansman, and that a split-second decision was made to allow the presentation to go ahead.

Prince George's County school librarian admits to using racist slur, retires

The Baltimore Sun

A now-former librarian at a Maryland public school was filmed admitting to calling a black man a racist slur and has since retired. News outlets report that Prince George's County Schools interim CEO Monica Goldson confirmed the retirement. Authorities haven't released the employee's identity. Goldson says students of color make up 90 percent of the school district and she's working to provide employees with bias training.

Butler County school board votes to phase out 'stereotyping' Native American mascot

Cincinnati Enquirer

A Butler County school district that has spent more than a decade debating a controversial Native American mascot will alter its name. The Talawanda Board of Education voted 3-2 Monday night to change the district's mascot name from "Braves" to "Brave" and phase out its associated imagery.

LGBTQ Students of Color Speak Up

The Education Trust

What does it mean to be young, gifted, and Black — when you’re also queer? This was the question posed to intersectional high school and college students at Duke Ellington School of the Arts in Washington, D.C. The event was hosted by Ed Trust, GLSEN, the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) and Education Leaders of Color (EdLoC). But as is typical in the theater, the students took center stage.

Louisiana School Made Headlines for Sending Black Kids to Elite Colleges. Here’s the Reality.

The NY Times

T.M. Landry has become a viral Cinderella story, a small school run by Michael Landry, a teacher and former salesman, and his wife, Ms. Landry, a nurse, whose predominantly black, working-class students have escaped the rural South for the nation’s most elite colleges. A video of a 16-year-old student opening his Harvard acceptance letter last year has been viewed more than eight million times. Other Landry students went on to Yale, Brown, Princeton, Stanford, Columbia, Dartmouth, Cornell and Wesleyan.

Latino Enrollment Shrank Where Police Worked With Federal Immigration Authorities

EdWeek

New evidence has emerged that cooperation between local law-enforcement officials and federal immigration authorities can drive immigrant students and their families from schools. Such voluntary partnerships between the federal government and 55 jurisdictions may have uprooted 300,000 Hispanic children from their schools between 2000 and 2011, according to a Stanford University study released last month.

New FBI Data: School-Based Hate Crimes Jumped 25 Percent Last Year — for the Second Year in a Row

The 74

Reported hate crimes at K-12 schools and colleges surged by 25 percent last year, according to new Federal Bureau of Investigation data — the second year in a row in which such incidents spiked by roughly a quarter. It’s also the third consecutive year that reported hate crimes increased more broadly, according to the FBI. Across all locations, reported hate crimes rose by 17 percent in 2017. Hate crimes most frequently occurred in or near homes, accounting for 28 percent of incidents.

Wake educator’s advice about ‘culturally appropriate’ Thanksgiving raises eyebrows

The News & Observer

A Wake County educator’s advice on teaching about Thanksgiving and Native Americans in a “culturally appropriate” way is drawing praise — and some complaints — on social media. Lauryn Mascareñaz, a director in the Wake County school system’s Office of Equity Affairs, tweeted Friday that teachers shouldn’t have their students engage in “cute” activities, such as having students make “Indian” feathers. She said teachers should instead tell students the “truth” about the nation’s relationship with Native Americans, including how Thanksgiving is viewed as a day of mourning by some groups.

40% of America’s Public Schools Don’t Have a Single Educator of Color. How the New Nonprofit BranchED Is Looking to Rethink That Minority Teacher Pipeline

The 74

As a teacher trainer at a historically black college, Nakeshia Williams runs up against a frequent tension. Williams, an associate professor at the Department of Educator Preparation at North Carolina A&T State University, regularly meets with area superintendents about hiring her future graduates. She finds officials eager to hire her students — teacher shortages abound in North Carolina — but skeptical of the quality of the teacher preparation they’re receiving.

School leadership: An untapped opportunity to draw young people of color into teaching

The Brookings Institution

Given the importance and visibility of school leaders, it is important to consider the racial and ethnic diversity of this group of educators. Administrators of color bring a number of unique strengths: More frequent exposure to people of color in authoritative positions can replace stereotyping and unconscious biases with acceptance and trust; leaders of color have a distinct advantage when interacting with community members that share their racial or ethnic background; and finally, leaders of color can contribute nuance and perspective for academic programs targeting students of color. As public schools increasingly serve more students of color, states and districts should also make a diverse corpus of principals a priority.

Research

The Long-Run Impacts of Same-Race Teachers

The National Bureau of Economic Research

We examine the impact of having a same-race teacher on students' long-run educational attainment. Leveraging random student-teacher pairings in the Tennessee STAR class-size experiment, we find that black students randomly assigned to a black teacher in grades K-3 are 5 percentage points (7%) more likely to graduate from high school and 4 percentage points (13%) more likely to enroll in college than their peers in the same school who are not assigned a black teacher.

Our Seperate and Unequal Public Colleges

Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce

Today’s higher education system is divided into two unequal tracks stratified by race and funding. White students are overrepresented at selective public colleges that are well-funded with high graduation rates, while Blacks and Latinos are funneled into overcrowded and underfunded open-access public colleges with low graduation rates. The gap in funding for instructional and academic support between selective and open-access public colleges has also been growing, which makes the system even more separate and unequal.

University Study Finds Children as Young as Seven Suffer from the Impacts of Discrimination

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education

A recent study from scholars at the University of California, Riverside has found that children as young as seven are sensitive to and suffer from the impacts of discrimination. The study also suggests that a strong sense of ethnic-racial identity is a significant buffer against these negative effects.

Inequities Persist: Access and Completion Gaps at Public Flagships in The Great Lakes Region

Institute for Higher Education Policy

Public flagship universities were established to provide educational opportunities to state residents and have a responsibility to promote social and economic mobility. But new IHEP research reveals that six of these premier public institutions are failing to enroll and graduate representative shares of their state’s low-income students and students of color.

The Connection Between Poverty, Race and College Preparation in Five Charts

The National Education Policy Center

More than 14 percent of the nation’s high school students attend schools where at least three quarters live in poverty. Most of these 1.8 million pupils are students of color. These low-in-come students and students of color are much less likely than their white and more affluent peers to attend and complete college. A new analysis illustrates one of the reasons why: These high schools with concentrated poverty are less likely to offer the coursework students need if they are to attend and succeed in four-year colleges.

Native American Student Success: The Effect of Tribal Colleges and Universities on Native American Student Retention

Penn Graduate School of Education

Native Americans have the lowest educational attainment of any racial or ethnic group (Center for Native American Youth at the Aspen Institute, n.d.). Fortunately, by attending a Tribal College or University (TCU) before attending a mainstream four-year institution, Native American students are four times more likely to receive their bachelor’s degree than their peers that attend a mainstream four-year institution immediately after high school (Boyer, 1997a).

The Connection Between Poverty, Race and College Preparation in Five Charts

The National Education Policy Center

More than 14 percent of the nation’s high school students attend schools where at least three quarters live in poverty. Most of these 1.8 million pupils are students of color. These low-in-come students and students of color are much less likely than their white and more affluent peers to attend and complete college. A new analysis illustrates one of the reasons why: These high schools with concentrated poverty are less likely to offer the coursework students need if they are to attend and succeed in four-year colleges.

Resources

Lesson plan: After helping Pilgrims at Plymouth, today’s Wampanoags fight for their ancestral lands

PBS

In this PBS lesson plan, students will learn about the Wampanoag people, the ancestors of the Native American tribes who welcomed the Pilgrims at Plymouth nearly 400 years ago. Then students will examine current issues facing the Wampanoags, including the continued fight for their ancestral lands and the preservation of their native language.

On the Margins Podcast

Filling the Gap Educational Consultants

This series will take an in depth look at the past, present and future of North Carolina schools in pursuit of understanding how to equalize opportunity for marginalized student groups. #FromMarginToCenter

Views

I’m a DACA Recipient and a First-Generation College Graduate and I’m Nervous About What’s Next

The Education Post

t’s a day I’ll never forget: September 5, 2017, the first day of my senior year at NYU. It was the day the Trump administration announced that they planned to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). What was supposed to be a joyous ride to the end of my undergraduate career was suddenly riddled with unnecessary stress and uncertainty about my future in this country.

We’re Still Here – Why Aren’t You Teaching To or About Us?

ACT Center for Equity in Learning

“Don’t they know we’re [American Indians] still alive?” As an adult, I’ve grappled with this question many times. More often than not, I’m ashamed to admit, I’ve gritted my teeth and looked the other way. However, it is not so easy to deflect this question when asked by my own child, an eight-year old American Indian attending a predominantly White school.

We measure what matters, which is why subgroups in ESSA accountability systems are important

Thomas B. Fordham Institute

Recently, Mike Petrilli wrote about the Alliance for Excellent Education’s analysis of state ESSA plans in which we found that twelve states do not ensure subgroups are universally included in school ratings. While acknowledging that this could be an issue, Mike, with an assist from Aaron Churchill, used Ohio data to make the case that we were (mostly) crying wolf: Including subgroups in school ratings doesn’t matter because subgroup performance is almost always reflected in schoolwide averages, at least when using value-added measures. Specifically, Mike and Aaron showed how school-level growth data for “all students” in Ohio tends to be strongly correlated with school-level growth data for “Black” and “low-income” students.

The Power of Educational Justice Movements

The Learning Policy Institute

ifty years after the release of the report of the Kerner Commission, our nation remains profoundly divided and unequal along racial and class lines. Nowhere is this clearer than in the education and life chances of our children and young people. The civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s spawned a war on poverty and a broad set of social reforms that led to significant progress in educational attainment and well-being of African Americans and Latinos through the 1970s and ’80s. Yet a conservative retrenchment halted progress in closing the racial “gap” in educational outcomes.

Equity Considerations for Policymakers & Researchers

Diverse Issues

With the face of higher education changing rapidly, colleges and universities are under increasing pressure to demonstrate their value to an increasingly skeptical public. New America reports that although Americans see the value in a college degree, they are disappointed with the higher education system, with millennials most likely to believe that colleges put the needs of the schools over that of students

Equity Considerations for Policymakers & Researchers

Diverse Issues

With the face of higher education changing rapidly, colleges and universities are under increasing pressure to demonstrate their value to an increasingly skeptical public. New America reports that although Americans see the value in a college degree, they are disappointed with the higher education system, with millennials most likely to believe that colleges put the needs of the schools over that of students

Local Control of Schools Is Historically and Politically Important in Black Communities. State Takeovers Disempower Them

The 74

Despite a mixed record of results, state takeovers remain a popular strategy to address persistently underperforming school districts. Clearly, many local districts face challenges with student achievement and finance, and responsible state governments should not remain idle when the education of our young is impeded by operationally impaired schools. It’s debatable whether states consistently have the ability to address and correct deficiencies in local school governance, and much of the criticism is just on that point — that student achievement shows no signs of measurable improvement following a state takeover.



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